Writers of Pro Football Prospectus 2008

08 Dec 2012

Cowboys LB Jerry Brown Killed In Crash, Teammate Arrested

Another Saturday, another day with terribly sad news coming out of the NFL. Per reports, around 2:30 A.M. Saturday, Cowboys practice squad linebacker Jerry Brown was killed when a vehicle driven by teammate and roommate Cowboys defensive lineman Josh Brent flipped over. Brent is currently in jail in Irving, TX, charged with intoxicated manslaughter for the fatal wreck. Condolences to Brown's family and friends, and the Cowboys organization.

Posted by: Tom Gower on 08 Dec 2012

11 comments, Last at 10 Dec 2012, 5:09pm by Mort

Comments

1
by The Ninjalectual :: Sat, 12/08/2012 - 10:48pm

When I was in college, I woke up one Sunday morning on a friends couch a few hours before football started. On the drive back to my house, where we had NFL Sunday Ticket, I stopped at a red light. I remember smiling at a cute girl in a green Saturn across the way. The light turned green--I hesitated for some reason, she didn't--a teenager in a big old, heavy 3/4 ton van blew through his red light and t-boned the Saturn on the driver's side. I watched it all in horror, as her car spun around, finally coming to rest on the sidewalk 25 yards from the road.

I called 911. I'll never understand or forgive the operator for asking me to get out of my car and walk up to hers, "to confirm that she's hurt and needs an ambulance." But I did as I was asked, and I probably won't ever forget seeing her there, swaying and moaning, perhaps even conscious, her matted and bloody hair covering lacerations on her head. Nor will I forget the look on the face of the terror-stricken teenager. He knew that in one tiny moment of carelessness, he made a mistake that caused two lives, his and hers, to be changed forever.

Even though we had NFL ticket that year, I couldn't watch football that week. It felt ridiculously trivial. I spent that morning sitting outside on the hood of my car, looking at cars driving by, wondering if it was worth having cars at all, if just one innocent girl's life could be saved by banishing them.

I love football. But that Sunday it was put into perspective for me, whether I wanted it to be or not. Even the next week, when I could suspend my disbelief again enough to get into the games and feel they were somehow important, they still didn't feel all that important.

2
by Hummingbird Cyborg :: Sun, 12/09/2012 - 12:10am

What a shitty, 911 operator. In instances of severe trauma, small amounts of time make big differences in survival rates. Asking you to check on her wasn't worth the time considering what you described.

3
by The Ninjalectual :: Sun, 12/09/2012 - 12:37am

I've had consistently bad luck with 911 calls and the police.

A different time, a friend and I were playing tennis when a car skidded to a stop on the road next to the courts, and two guys and a girl spilled out to continue an argument. After one of the guys punched the girl in the face, we yelled at them to leave. Turns out he was on meth, and all it did was draw his attention toward us instead of her. We dialed 911 as he and his buddy scaled a 20-foot tall chain link fence to attempt to fight us instead, and NO ONE ANSWERED OUR 911 CALL! At that point we just ran--thank goodness neither of them had a gun, something we didn't consider until afterwards--and 15 mins later a 911 operator called us back and accused us of abusing 911 by calling and hanging up. If he had a gun we'd have been dead by then.

As it happened, an off-duty sherrif's deputy witnessed everything, and followed the two meth-heads--who were on foot--in his Ram pickup. When they noticed him following them, they charged his truck! He drove off and returned to the courts, where we were talking to a uniformed, on-duty cop, and gave the cop their description and whereabouts. The cop then proceeded to do absolutely nothing. He clearly wanted nothing to do with those guys, even when my friend pointed out that SOMEBODY's going to get hurt if he didn't do anything, which is exactly what he did. What a lazy asshole.

In another separate incident, I witnessed a guy promise/threaten to kill his girlfriend with a dagger he had there in his bag. I left the building and dialed 911, told them the details, and TWENTY-THREE MINUTES LATER the police called back, saying they just arrived at the scene (which was right downtown) and asked if I was still there to let them in the front door of the apartment building. I was nowhere near the building, of course. They did eventually get inside and they met the guy who was making the threats, and proceeded to not arrest him. A third party ended up getting beat up because the thug thought this other guy was who called the cops on him, and the girl had to quit her job and move out of town in a hurry because she (legitimately, IMO) feared for her life.

Maybe it's just Colorado, but 911 operators and police are absolutely worthless.

4
by Guest789 :: Sun, 12/09/2012 - 12:44am

I only ever called 911 once, and it was by accident. The operator called me back 2 minutes later, and when I explained that it was a mistake, and I wasn't speaking under duress, he told me that the police were coming by to check anyway. Less than 10 minutes later, 3 cops showed up, and proceeded to check my entire house to ensure there was no one hiding or anything.

Just figured I'd give a good experience as a counterbalance.

-----

“Treat a man as he is, and he will remain as he is. Treat a man as he could be, and he will become what he should be.”

5
by Deelron :: Sun, 12/09/2012 - 3:40am

The same, I've called 911 twice, once in San Leandro for a nearby domestic fight and once in Washington State (south of Tacoma in unincorated Pierce County) when I was taking out garbage and hear my elderly neighbor call for help (she had fallen hanging a flower basket). Both times the responses were fairly quick and completely professional, never once sounding like it was a hassle or something negative. Sad to hear about the bad experiences, particularly the first one, what an awful response when time is of the essence.

8
by Independent George :: Sun, 12/09/2012 - 10:39pm

I called 911 once, to help a lady who had just escaped a mugger. The operator was polite and direct, and a police car was on scene within 5 minutes. I can't even imagine experiencing what Ninjalectual went through.

6
by DisplacedPackerFan :: Sun, 12/09/2012 - 12:06pm

This is where I put my modern day 911 awareness post. Old cell phones that don't have a service contract can still call 911 and they generally don't have any of the GPS or locator service that new phones do, so the operators have no idea where it's coming from and have to spend time and effort to parse all that out. In my little town that only gets about 70 calls a week, they reported that about 15 of them were from old cell phones, mostly from kids playing with them, some of them from people thinking prank calling 911 is funny. So if you want to let your kid play with an old cell phone, take the battery out.

You can google for various news articles from around the country on it, but it is becoming an actual issue. Here with such a low volume not so much, but if 20% of the calls are accidental, and it takes around 5 minutes to verify, especially if it's a toddler who might have accidentally made the call, that's can add up a lot in a major area.

7
by Bowl Game Anomaly :: Sun, 12/09/2012 - 1:33pm

I've called 911 a bunch of times, but most of them were for medical non-emergencies. (I wouldn't want to clutter up 911 with non-emergencies, but in NYC if you call 311 and tell them you need an ambulance they will insist that you call 911 no matter if it is an emergency or not. They also direct you to call 911 for police matters regardless of whether it's an emergency (such as a vehicle break-in), unless you're making a noise complaint.) I've called a few times for medical emergencies and generally had positive experiences. I've never called 911 for an emergency police matter but I've seen others have response times slow enough that the matter would obviously have resolved itself one way or the other before they got there.

9
by Clemson Matt (not verified) :: Mon, 12/10/2012 - 11:14am

Same thing here. I found my car hit bad in a parking lot, and needed to file a report, but they insisted on 911. Clearly not an emergency.

On the other hand, the other day I got flagged down by an hysterical woman in the road who said her neighbor was firing all over the place killing his fighting roosters and dogs (rural SC...what can I say?). I called 911, heard shots, and started driving. The woman then started grilling me on what kind of gun. And "larger than a .22 but smaller than a military rifle by the sound" was not enough detail. I couldn't see, and sure wasn't going to turn around with my wife, 2.5 year old, and infant in the car.

10
by AT (not verified) :: Mon, 12/10/2012 - 3:20pm

In other news Bob Costas called for the banning of cars and alcohol this week on SNF. Oh, wait, he didn't.

I have a tip for all you metro-sexual pansies who "can't imagine" experiencing a slow 911 response: A house full of guns and a concealed carry permit can help you out with those angst-ridden, cowardly walks away from a potential killer and a woman in danger.

11
by Mort (not verified) :: Mon, 12/10/2012 - 5:09pm

Ain't no difference between an AK and a lambo--neither will make you a real man.