Writers of Pro Football Prospectus 2008

24 Apr 2013

2012 OL Continuity Scores

I had a reader send an e-mail asking for the 2012 OL Continuity Scores. We don't normally put these up on the site, they just show up in the book, but there's no reason I can't share. Here are all the scores for 2012 along with each team's details, score for 2011, and year-to-year change.

Team Continuity
Score
Number
of Starters
Line
Changes
Longest
Stretch
Cont Score
2011
Y-Y
Change
MIN 48 5 0 16 33 15
NYJ 48 5 0 16 41 7
SF 48 5 0 16 43 5
WAS 43 6 2 14 23 20
MIA 42 6 1 12 29 13
ATL 40 6 1 10 34 6
CLE 40 6 1 10 39 1
DET 39 6 2 10 43 -4
TB 36 7 3 9 32 4
CIN 35 7 2 7 32 3
GB 35 7 4 9 30 5
HOU 33 7 3 6 43 -10
NYG 33 6 4 6 26 7
NO 32 8 5 8 34 -2
OAK 32 8 4 7 37 -5
ARI 31 8 5 7 31 0
Team Continuity
Score
Number
of Starters
Line
Changes
Longest
Stretch
Cont Score
2011
Y-Y
Change
PHI 31 9 4 7 31 0
BAL 30 7 5 5 36 -6
CHI 30 9 6 8 31 -1
KC 30 8 5 6 39 -9
DEN 29 7 5 4 48 -19
DAL 28 8 6 5 36 -8
TEN 28 11 5 7 39 -11
BUF 27 10 5 5 25 2
PIT 26 9 6 4 22 4
STL 26 9 6 4 27 -1
CAR 25 8 8 4 32 -7
JAC 25 10 8 6 31 -6
NE 23 8 10 4 24 -1
SEA 23 8 9 3 27 -4
IND 22 8 10 3 22 0
SD 22 9 9 3 28 -6

Posted by: Aaron Schatz on 24 Apr 2013

7 comments, Last at 29 Apr 2013, 3:34pm by Bobman

Comments

1
by peterplaysbass :: Thu, 04/25/2013 - 11:52am

And the NFC North wins the divisional offensive line continuity award by a landslide!

Average rank:
NFC N 10
NFC E 14
NFC S 14
AFC N 15
AFC E 15
NFC W 19
AFC W 22
AFC S 24

2
by DisplacedPackerFan :: Thu, 04/25/2013 - 12:46pm

What do they say? There is an exception to every rule? If continuity helps explains good line play, I guess the NFC North is that exception. If there were a division that needed to break continuity and get some better starters on the line, it's the NFC North.

3
by PantsB :: Fri, 04/26/2013 - 12:20pm

It also doesn't explain why the Patriots have consistently strong OL play despite #4 from the bottom for 2012 and #2 from the bottom in 2011 using this metric.

4
by MJK :: Fri, 04/26/2013 - 3:54pm

There are two reasons why a team might have poor continuity. One is that you are talent starved and are trying different things, and the other is that you have a lot of versatile guys and can afford to shuffle when injuries hit.

Conversley, there are two reasons why you could have consistency. One is that you have five clear talented guys who manage to go injury free; the other is that you don't have any one better even if your starters are weak.

5
by Lelouch vi Britannia (not verified) :: Sat, 04/27/2013 - 12:03am

Just based off of these scores, it doesn't seem like the metric has much correlation to the line play quality. NE is obviously top 5, SEA and DEN are top 10 IMO.

6
by Anonymousse (not verified) :: Sun, 04/28/2013 - 6:42pm

This metric is useless.

Continuity results from quality line play, not the other way around.

7
by Bobman :: Mon, 04/29/2013 - 3:34pm

As Andrew Luck's chiropractor and I both expected, the Colts were near the bottom. Enough said about that. But the other teams near the bottom included run-first Seattle and score-at-will New England. Maybe the differences were that those two teams rotated decent OL players through the season while the Colts rotated in talented but narcoleptic HS-caliber players. And as for a few bottom-feeder teams (in terms of records) at the top with great continuity... same thing? If your OL isn't really helping much, what's the point of keeping it intact? Although the Jets' issues weren't necessarily an underperforming OL.

I do recall that a couple of Indy's best offensive games coincided with 4-5 guys on OL who had also played together the previous week--suggesting that continuity helped them, at least in the micro view.

I WANT the continuity scores to mean something in terms of production, but not certain they do. Adrian Peterson might disagree with me....