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NCAA to Allow Athletes to Cash in on Their Fame

I'll just quote this paragraph from the AP story: "The NCAA Board of Governors has taken the first step toward allowing athletes to cash in on their fame. The board voted unanimously on Tuesday to clear the way for the amateur athletes to 'benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness.'"

It's not a done deal yet, but it appears that collegiate athletes will finally be able to profit from their celebrity status while maintaining athletic eligibility with the NCAA, as common sense would dictate. The biggest impact this would have on most football fans would be the long-awaited return of EA Sports' NCAA Football video game series. Fingers crossed. 

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Comments

21 comments, Last at 30 Oct 2019, 4:28pm

1 I'm sure someone will offer…

I'm sure someone will offer some unintended consequences I'm overlooking now, but on the surface this seems like a good thing to me.

2 The unintended consequence…

The unintended consequence seems to me to most likely be:

More money goes to popular athletes

With a semi- fixed pool of money, that means less for coaches, administrators, and non popular athletes. Two of those don't really bother me.  Decreasing quality of fields, facilities, and support for other college sports, especially women's sports, is my worry.

3 Out of the three you listed,…

Out of the three you listed, it's not clear to me how much actually goes to the number 3. Some does, but I doubt much of it does. it seems to me the money would go most of the people who have most control, which are the coaches and administrators.

15 I'd guess this move probably…

I'd guess this move probably kills, or at least dampens, the "facility arms race" that indirectly benefited the "non popular athletes" through Title IX and other policies that required equal access or at least equivalent facilities, so it would be sort of like money being taken from them in that manner. But in the grand scheme it was only a small subset of schools that were 'participating' in the "race," and those all now have cutting edge facilities that ought to be more than sufficient for decades to come, so it shouldn't be a huge tragedy.

9 Also, it won't be just the…

Also, it won't be just the big name athletes. I guarantee somebody like a buffet chain in Alabama, or Gold's Gym in Venice Beach, will be willing to pay Alabama's or USC's starting  offensive line 10k each to endorse their businesses.

13 That seems certainly…

That seems certainly possible, even likely.

I was only speaking to possible unforeseen consequences. Which it wouldn't totally blow my mind if there ended up not being that much money on the sidelines

4 One of the fascinating…

One of the fascinating unintended consequences will be how this affects super Star college athletes in the draft.

 

This is more relevant for the NBA, but let's say a player is eligible for the draft and is likely to be the number one pick. The rookie wage scale caps how much they can earn in the NBA or the NFL and so it may be advantageous for them to stay in college to avoid being drafted by a horrible team or less preferred destination.

 

As an example, Tua or Trevor might prefer to stay in college to avoid being drafted by the tanking dolphins or the awful Bengals and the monetary loss may not be lesson somewhat by this move.

5 Not really an unintended…

Not really an unintended consequence since it's right there in the statement but there is plenty of room in "a manner consistent with the collegiate model" for the NCAA to be just as corrupt and immoral as they've always been.

19 At the very least, given how…

At the very least, given how absolutist the NCAA has been regarding athlete compensation, I think today's announcement signals an acknowledgement on their part that they know that the legal and political standing of the status quo is not going to hold. There are many battles to be fought, but at the end of the day they will stop pretending, as asswipes like Jim Delaney or the President of Notre Dame have suggested, that they would actually let the college sports industry die out before compensating players. They will manage the inevitable changes.

21 They did what they had…

They did what they had absolutely no choice but to do and I suppose some de minimis kudos are in order for that. They'll still have to be dragged kicking and screaming to a position that is remotely fair to athletes, and I look forward to the next time Delaney and Emmert put their feet in their mouths.

6 The NCAA and Power 5 schools…

The NCAA and Power 5 schools must be terrified, of having antitrust law finally fully applied to them, if they were willing to make this concession, without first litigating it all the way to the Supreme Court. The dam is breached, and it's just a question of when total collapse happens.

My guess is that they just might be smart enough to get in front of this, by getting the athletes to organize, perhaps with Congress advising, so as to get to a global settlement as quickly as possible.

10 The NCAA is going to have…

The NCAA is going to have allow these athletes to hire agents as well. You can't say it is allowed for athletes to get paid for their names and likenesses, but they are prohibited from hiring legal representation to advance that purpose.

14 The "no-agent" rule has been…

The "no-agent" rule has been on shaky legal ground for a long time now. It seems like this might be the thing that finally topples it, but I wouldn't be surprised if the NCAA tries to keep it propped up (like, 'athletes are allowed to have representation during negotiations for endorsements but not for contracts that directly exchange money for playing services' or somesuch hair-splitting).

16 I fart in the general…

I fart in the general direction of the lawyers and whoever else got in the way of me getting NCAA Football for PS4 the last several years! Cant wait for NCAA Football on PS4 next year babay! Yeehaw!

20 well, gee

The NCAA has been making money off player likenesses since the days of Ed O'Bannon. (Well, since O'Bannon's lawsuit 10 years ago.)

Nice of them to let the players themselves get a share.

The NCAA's defense at the time was that paying the players would "compromise amateurism". So, of course, they needed to keep all the money themselves.