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Buccaneers Working to Add Antonio Brown

Well, this is disappointing. Tampa Bay is working to add Antonio Brown to their roster. His suspension is finally over after Week 8 and he would be able to play after that. Tom Brady befriended Brown during Brown's short time with the Patriots and is working to get him down to Tampa. The problem is that Antonio Brown really isn't someone you can root for. He has a history of sexual misconduct, domestic incidents, and disturbing harassment of the women in his life. He's a very talented receiver, but frankly, the NFL is a better place without him. I think Tampa Bay is one of this year's top Super Bowl contenders, and I don't really want the season to end with a remorseless Antonio Brown hoisting the Lombardi Trophy.

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25 comments, Last at 27 Oct 2020, 12:32pm

1 I actually wore a shirt for…

I actually wore a shirt for the first time in several years on Sunday; sure, Brady has some . . . grating things about him, but getting to see guys like Mike Evans and Lavonte David actually win has been nice, so I begrudgingly decided to re-active my fandom.

Antonio Brown?  Screw that.  I hope the entire franchise is scoured away by a hurricane and the earth around the site of Raymond James Stadium is doused in salt so nothing grows there ever again.

4 As a Seahawks fan I'm glad to see AB go to the Bucs

The recent talk was AB to the Seahawks but that didn't make sense with Locket and Metcalf healthy and doing great. AB would take away their targets. And he's a DIVA big time and would likely bitch about lack of  targets. Evans and Godwin are both good/great but have some injury issues.  AB is (maybe)* a better fit in TB.

 

*good luck with that TB!

5 I've been saying on other…

I've been saying on other threads that guys like AB express the turmoil and chaos of their inner worlds onto everybody and everything around them.  Terrell Owens is another good example of this.

It's been a year since we last saw AB and there's a possibility that whatever was bothering him last year has subsided* and he will get on with being a good teammate and so on. 

But more likely, he will do something to up-end things and get himself kicked off the Bucs once he starts to feel settled in. While it's not a good short-term look for the NFL, he'll probably manage himself out of it.

6 Before he gets kicked off…

Before he gets kicked off the Bucs, I hope he a least does something silly/entertaining we can all laugh about, like try to hand draw the Bucs logo on a helmet the NFL doesn't want him to wear.  

I've actually been happy for Bucs fans this season, but I've lost interest in rooting for their success with Brown on the team.  His actions speak for themselves.

8 Yeah - the stint with the…

Yeah - the stint with the Raiders was classic ... helmet, freezing his feet, making videos about the GM/coach (or some such) ... all inside 2-3 months ....

It's going to be hard to top ... Terrell already did situps in his driveway ... but I'm sure AB will think of something ....

9 I could swear I remember…

I could swear I remember Bruce Arians in the offseason saying that there was no way Antonio Brown would be a fit for the team.

And not to deflect, but while we're on the subject of people who shouldn't be involved in the NFL, how does Gregg Williams keep getting jobs? The dude is not a super-genius. There's gotta be some other coaches who deserve a shot.

10 “Yeah, it’s not gonna happen…

“Yeah, it’s not gonna happen. There’s no room. And probably not enough money. But it’s not gonna happen — it’s not a fit here. I just know him, and — it’s not a fit in our locker room. He’s too much of a diva,” Arians said of Brown in March.

12 And then Tom Brady happened…

And then Tom Brady happened.  He pressed the Patriots to get Brown and they did.  He pressed the Patriots to get Sanu, and they did.  Now he's pressed the Buccaneers to do something that Arians really doesn't want to do, but we've got to keep the short-term quarterback happy right.

Someone upthread remarked that it reveals a lot about Brady's character, and I agree.  If Kim Jong Un could run a 4.5 and catch (maybe he can...I remember hearing that he shot a 21 on the golf course), Brady would be lobbying for him. 

But I'm not sure if I can condemn him for it.  Athletes want to win, and there's a long history of great NFL players who were less than solid citizens that can help teams win.  Brady might not want Brown to babysit his daughter, or drive his housekeeper home, but when desparate to win another championship, ethics start to crumble at the fringes.  It's easy to justify signing him in one of those "Look, he's paid his dues, and we all deserve fourth chances," moments.

11 Dumb

Dumb signinf by buvcanerd. Not a tram to want to seedo good now

 

15 Whence “Remorseless”? He…

Whence “Remorseless”?

He served his suspension, and apparently stayed out of any trouble, and met other requirements to be reinstated. 

Imagine if your sentence had read “a reformed Antonio Brown” rather than “a remorseless Antonio Brown”. Brown succeeding after changing his ways would then be a feel-good story of the NFL’s tough discipline working as intended for once, and of the possibility of redemption.

I get that you (Aaron) believe he has not actually reformed his actions or attitudes. What has he done during his long suspension that leads you to believe that? 

20 Huh? Remorseless is entirely…

Huh?

Remorseless is entirely appropriate - it's hard to claim that in his "public apology" he ever showed remorse for his actions (as opposed to the consequences), considering he deflected blame onto everyone else, and literally the only thing he said is that he owed the entire NFL an apology, which is like saying "sorry for getting caught, NFL."

Someone can be reformed (as in - he won't do it again) without being remorseful. As in - he recognizes what he did was wrong, not that he did it. It's like someone saying "oh, no, I could never assault someone again, I'd end up in prison" as opposed to "I could never assault someone again, that would be wrong."

"I get that you (Aaron) believe he has not actually reformed his actions or attitudes. What has he done during his long suspension that leads you to believe that?"

Actions, yes. Attitudes? Did you see the "apology," where he spent more time casting blame on media and the NFL than talking about any issues he had? As in, "do you need mental help?" "We all need mental help." and claiming that the reason there are multiple cases against him is that he's a target.

21 Agreed

Agreed,

I don't care if the man who collects my garbage has a criminal record. In the same way I don't care much about the moral status of those who play in the NFL. The man has a unique gift, as long as he stays on the right side of the law I say let him play - and I think the opposing arguments are actually kind of immoral. 

22 You're confusing two things…

In reply to by sbond101

You're confusing two things. I don't care about someone's criminal record either. That can be the result of lots of things. I do care, however, if they're a jackass (or, y'know, evil). To continue your metaphor, if the guy who collects my garbage is a total dick, yeah, it'd bother me, even if he was good at his job. If he leers and makes inappropriate remarks to people as he passes them in the neighborhood, that wouldn't bother you?

Now you might say "well, that's different, he's doing it on the job, whereas this isn't on the job for Brown," but 1) he actually did plenty of it "on the job," and 2) being in the NFL means being a public figure, which means he's always on the job. Football fans are fans of the team, and it's completely moral to want the people on the team that you're fans of to at least have behavior (if not beliefs) the public finds acceptable.

There's a difference between saying "I don't want him to have a job" and "I don't want any team to hire him."

23 I'm not confusing them

I'm not confusing them. I intentionally chose picking up my garbage because it's another job, like football, generally pursued by who have a variety of failing. As far as I'm concerned if someone does that job well and stays on the right side of the law (i.e. doesn't rise to the level of harassment) he should be left alone. Teams have the right to decide when A-holishness becomes intolerable for those who have to work with AB - but I think it's kind of busy-body-ish for fans to litigate that without being in the room.

"There's a difference between saying "I don't want him to have a job" and "I don't want any team to hire him."" - I suppose this difference is simply that NFL players are public figures. I think there is a straighforward solution - stop reading/caring about human interest stories about players with serious personal problems. Now there no longer public figures to you in a meaningful way. Problem solved.

25 "Teams have the right to…

"Teams have the right to decide when A-holishness becomes intolerable for those who have to work with AB - but I think it's kind of busy-body-ish for fans to litigate that without being in the room."

I don't understand this at all. Imagine going to the store. There are 2 TVs there. One's clearly better than the other (higher definition, more features, whatever) but it's painted a garish orange and whenever you turn it on, it's like "WTF do you want to watch, moron?" And whenever you switch on a channel to watch something, it says "seriously, you're watching this? You know nothing about television, man." And if the person watching's a girl, it'll make demeaning comments like "you shouldn't be watching this, watch this other show, guys will like you then." The other TV has some smart assistant thing that's actually helpful, polite, and engages with the person watching.

You think it's surprising that people would say "yeah, I don't want that first one?" And that a store would refuse to carry it?

Because that's the exact same thing. The team only can pay the player through money the consumer - the fans - pay them. And if the fans say "nope" the team has to consider that.

Now, to be fair, there is a line here - because of course, you could imagine you could've said exactly the same thing back in the 1960s. So you can totally imagine a team taking a stance and saying "look, I know there's public dislike about this, but we don't agree with their opinion of the player." But that's not what's going on here. Literally the Bucs are flat out acknowledging that Brown's on a short leash, meaning even they aren't sure about him.

"I suppose this difference is simply that NFL players are public figures. I think there is a straighforward solution - stop reading/caring about human interest stories about players with serious personal problems. "

seriously don't understand this. Why would I be a fan of a team full of people who I dislike? Why would I choose to be a fan of a team where I know, for instance, I can't go and meet the players? Or I can't actually listen to a postgame conference with my kids?

This is a very bizarre stance to have. Actually, I should be clearer: this is a very bizarre stance to insist isn't okay. I guess I can understand people who just don't care who the actual players are playing, which is fine.

But it seems very strange to suggest that the solution to someone who cares about who the players are on the team they're a fan of should stop caring about who the players are. It's completely reasonable fan behavior.

24 Honestly, I used to hate Tom…

Honestly, I used to hate Tom Brady with a passion. At age 43, I just have to cheer for him. Even if they sign Brown, I'll still cheer for him, in these last few years of his career.