2023 NFL Draft

Our top 100 prospects

Get positional rankings, proprietary stats and in-depth player analysis. Read more draft insights from Mike Tanier in Walkthrough.

Updated April 25th, 9:00 am ET
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    Bijan Robinson
    1

    Bijan Robinson

    NEW
    RB
    Height
    6'0"
    Weight
    222
    Class
    Junior
    RB
    Expand

    Five years ago, Robinson would have been a top-five pick. Forty years ago, when running backs had a greater relative impact in the NFL than they do now, Robinson might have deserved a top-five pick. We're finally past the event horizon of running backs getting drafted in the top 20 or so—even traditionalists of the Dave Gettleman generation learned too many lessons the hard way—but we shouldn't lose sight of how special Robinson is, or the fact that he could have a Todd Gurley/Saquon Barkley/Ezekiel Elliott-level immediate impact.

    Robinson is a walking highlight reel coming off a 1,580-yard season. He possesses every move on the PS5 controller, including the combos that he strings together in traffic. His vision at the line of scrimmage is outstanding, allowing him to shuffle left or right in search of a crease, and he's tough to bring down, even in first gear. Once in the open field, he can breeze away from defenders.

    Robinson can get a little too lateral, especially in short-yardage situations, and mixes drag-the-defense finishes with runs where he goes down more suddenly than expected; Robinson runs a little upright at times, giving defenders too clean a shot at him.

    Robinson wasn't used much as a receiver (19 catches in 2022), but many of his targets and receptions came downfield. He mixes outstanding reps in pass-protection with bloopers, but he's more refined and rugged as a blocker than most collegiate featured backs.

    Robinson is instinctive enough to turn 1-yard losses into 5-yard gains and 5-yard gains into 50-yarders. Like Saquon and others before him, his productive peak will likely be brief, so he fits best with a contender seeking a "win-more" playmaker.

    Robinson enters the NFL at the wrong time for an old-fashioned big-program workhorse rusher, but at least he was in college at the right time: thanks to NIL, he has already earned over $1 million for his talents. That makes it easier to state that while Robinson is one of the 10 best prospects in the 2023 class, he still should not be drafted until the second round.

    Stat Note: Robinson led all Power 5 conference rushers in both broken (46) and missed (40) tackles, per Sports Info Solutions. His Broken Plus Missed Tackle Rate of 33.3% tied USC's Caleb Williams for second in the nation among major-conference rushers, behind Oregon's Mar'keise Irving. Both Williams and Irving had over 100 fewer carries than Robinson.

    Tyjae Spears
    2

    Tyjae Spears

    NEW
    RB
    Height
    5'9"
    Weight
    204
    Class
    Junior
    RB
    Expand

    When Tyjae Spears turned the corner and burst up the right sideline near the end of the first day of Senior Bowl practices, he looked like a Lamborghini changing lanes at the light and leaving a highway full of station wagons in the dust.

    It would have been a familiar sight to anyone who saw Spears go 17-205-4 in the Cotton Bowl against USC: Spears has the burst, moves, and leg drive to reach the open field, and he has a fourth gear once he gets there. But Senior Bowl practices revealed another side to Spears' game: he shined in pass-protection drills, and pass protection is what decides which rookie running backs see the field and which ones get left on the practice squad, lest they get their quarterback creamed.

    The AAC Offensive Player of the Year in 2022, Spears is a compact 204-pound back with a one-cut style who isn't afraid of contact in the hole. He's creative in the open field, and arm-tacklers don't stand a chance on the perimeter. He's a capable outlet receiver and lined up as a Wildcat quarterback in some short-yardage situations. There aren't many negatives to his game except for the fact that his 204-pound Senior Bowl weight might have the result of chugging a gallon of water before stepping on the scale, and the fact that he is not Bijan Robinson.

    Spears looks a little like an upgraded version of the Jets' Michael Carter. His carry share will have to be managed, but he can provide move-the-chains production, explosive plays, and all-purpose passing-game utility in a 20-touch role.

    Quote of Note: Spears, from the Senior Bowl: "I don't wanna be considered a third-down back. I wanna be considered a four-down back. I don't want to be taken out when it's fourth-and-2. I can get you 2 yards and keep the drive moving."

    Jahmyr Gibbs
    3

    Jahmyr Gibbs

    NEW
    RB
    Height
    5'11"
    Weight
    200
    Class
    Junior
    RB
    Expand

    There were times when Gibbs looked like Christian McCaffrey in 2022. The Georgia Tech transfer was one of the most polished backfield receivers in the nation, often getting open on angle routes and shallow crossers in addition to the usual screens and swing passes. Gibbs also dragged arm-tacklers on the second level and in the open field. He was reputedly the fastest player on the Crimson Tide roster, and he could accelerate to full speed quickly when exploding through the hole. Gibbs can also make the first man miss, and he can bounce runs to the outside or the backside without running himself into trouble.

    For every McCaffrey or Alvin Kamara, there's a Clyde Edwards-Helaire or three who reaped the benefits of a stacked program and became just another doesn't-matter running back in the NFL. Gibbs looks more like the former than the latter, in part because of his production on a weak Georgia Tech team early in his career, in part for the yards after contact he gained on his own in 2022 (3.4 per attempt, a respectable 10th in the SEC), and in part because of his receiving polish.

    Gibbs merits a very early Day 2 selection. He could become a developing quarterback's best friend as a checkdown and outlet receiver, and while he'll likely rotate with a bigger back, he could be a valuable addition to PPR fantasy leagues as a rookie.

    Stat Note: Gibbs ran to his designed gap on just 60.3% of carries, the fifth-lowest figure among 26 SEC rushers with 100-plus carries. The freelancing could be a problem, or it could allow Gibbs to survive behind a weaker NFL line and allow him to have a Javonte Williams-like early impact.

    Zach Charbonnet
    4

    Zach Charbonnet

    NEW
    RB
    Height
    6'0"
    Weight
    214
    Class
    Senior
    RB
    Expand

    When watching UCLA games on autumn Saturday nights, often with a cocktail in hand, your humble author thought this young man's name was "Zach Chardonnay." A nickname was even coined: WINE DADDY. Fortunately, I corrected myself long before the draft process began, which spared me much embarrassment and you a corny joke. Or did it?

    Anyway, Cabernet Charbonnet is big, well-built, and quick-footed, and he catches the ball well. He's a bruising finisher who usually drags his tackler an extra yard or two after contact. He bursts from first to third gear through the hole in a hurry. He snatches the ball from the air on screens and in the flat. Charbonnet is an excellent third-and-medium checkdown target who can make his first defender miss to get past the sticks.

    Charbonnet runs a little upright, lacks a fourth gear, and can be a little quick to bounce plays to the outside. His Chip Kelly-coached footwork before the handoff—a little drop-step, like a point guard setting defenders up for a drive—will probably have to be coached out of him. A Michigan transfer, Charbonnet also played four college seasons and absorbed a lot of touches over the last two years.

    Charbonnet is a (baggage-free) Joe Mixon type capable of making a quick impact as an all-purpose featured back.

    Bryce Young
    5

    Bryce Young

    NEW
    QB
    Height
    5'10"
    Weight
    204
    Class
    Junior
    QB
    Expand

    Is Young tiny-but-awesome or awesome-but-tiny? The answer depends on how much skin you have in the game.

    Those of us whose careers don't depend upon Young's NFL success can safely join the tiny-but-awesome camp. Young is experienced, reads defenses well, has a variety of advanced-placement quarterback skills, handles the pass rush and make-or-break situations effectively, makes some plays with his legs, and has a live arm: who cares if he weighed less than the waterboy?

    NFL types are more likely to fall into the awesome-but-tiny category. Young packed on 204 pounds for the combine, but he may have been as light as 170 pounds on autumn Saturdays. He suffered a 2022 injury on a rather routine hit. And while Young saw the middle of the field very well for a quarterback of his stature, it's easier to block up throwing lanes at Alabama than it will be in Houston or Indianapolis.

    Young has the tools—particularly when it comes to "soft skills" such as pocket presence, eye discipline, and checkdown timing—to be a Day 1 starter in the NFL. The trick will be survival to see Days 2 and 3. Young is a safe top-five pick from a talent and character standpoint but a considerable risk due to his wispiness, especially if that 204 pounds was all pre-weigh-in breakfast buffet. (Or worse: he keeps it on, but his ankles and knees aren't built for it.)

    The bottom line is that Young has Drew Brees upside, and that like Brees he will probably need some offensive customization—and perhaps patience with early-career injuries—to achieve that upside.

    The Texans not-so-secretly adore Young, so he will probably be the No. 2 pick in this year's draft at the latest. The Texans must then protect their investment by bulwarking their interior offensive line in later rounds. If they don't, they risk breaking one of the most exciting college football players of this century the moment they take him out of the box.

    Stat Note: Young completed 35-of-57 passes of 5-plus air yards over the middle of the field for 590 yards, four touchdowns, and one interception. The rate stats are fine, but what's noteworthy is that only Will Rogers (Mississippi State) and Stetson Bennett (Georgia) threw downfield over the middle more often than Young. Despite his shortitude, he can locate his targets.

    C.J. Stroud
    6

    C.J. Stroud

    NEW
    QB
    Height
    6'3"
    Weight
    214
    Class
    Sophomore
    QB
    Expand

    It is impossible, and inappropriate, to NOT "program scout" or "helmet scout" an Ohio State quarterback.

    Those who bristle at the mere notion of Ohio State's history of producing disappointing quarterbacks, or who claim to be cyborgs of objectivity capable of filtering out the distortions caused by playing behind an offensive line full of future NFL starters while throwing to future Offensive Rookies of the Year, are simply not learning from the mistakes of the past. There's wisdom in watching someone like Stroud throw a deep over from a spotless pocket to a wide-open Marvin Harrison Jr. and realizing, yup, the program was a major factor on that play, and Cardale Jones completed a similar pass to Michael Thomas in 2015.

    So it's instructive to embrace helmet scouting—to a degree—and report that:

    • Stroud has the best timing and accuracy on short-to-intermediate routes of any Ohio State quarterback of the last 20 years.
    • Stroud slides around the pocket and resets his feet before throwing better than any Ohio State quarterback of the last 20 years.
    • Stroud finds secondary targets and moves defenders with his eyes better than any Ohio State quarterback of the last 20 years.

    In other words, Stroud is a much better pocket and game manager than Justin Fields or the others who came before him. He's also a judicious runner who is dangerous when he gets a head of steam and can barrel for yardage on designed carries. He can deliver downfield strikes from a collapsing pocket, and he can find sideline targets when extending pays. Yes, the fact that those targets are named after their Hall of Fame dads helps turn those difficult sideline passes into receptions, but Stroud still gets the ball there.

    Stroud's most notable flaw is that passes outside the numbers consistently sail high and outside on his receivers. His eyes are inconsistent, and he will lock onto his primary for too long at times. Stroud isn't quite nifty enough as a scrambler to spin out of the back of the pocket in the NFL like he did at times in college, so that move will probably have to be jettisoned. He attempts heroics off his back foot a little too often. Most of these flaws, however, are just standard "developing quarterback" issues.

    Stroud has a Ben Roethlisberger ceiling: there are shades of early-career Big Ben in his poise, touch/timing, and rushing style. It's not unusual for Ohio State quarterbacks to earn gaudy, ambitious comparisons like that. Where Stroud differs from his predecessors is his high floor as a more mobile Jacoby Brissett type who can operate efficiently within structure.

    At his worst, Stroud can be an NFL game manager. That's an asset that few of his Buckeyes predecessors possessed.

    An interesting median comparison for Stroud, with his pocket touch/timing and habit of getting antsy in a collapsing pocket: Highly Mobile Jared Goff. If you think about it, a dual-threat version of Goff would be one heck of a quarterback.

    Jaxon Smith-Njigba
    7

    Jaxon Smith-Njigba

    NEW
    WR
    Height
    6'1"
    Weight
    196
    Class
    Junior
    WR
    Expand

    Smith-Njigba led the Buckeyes in receiving with a 95-1,606-9 statline in 2021, catching more passes for more yards and more yards per reception than Garrett Wilson and Chris Olave. Smith-Njigba often upstaged Wilson and Olave (the winner and one of the top runners up for Offensive Rookie of the Year in 2022) on 2021 Saturdays with his ability to snap off short slot routes and turn them into big gains. But a hamstring injury limited him to just five games in 2022, and whisper-mongers began to suggest that he was lollygagging to protect himself for the 2023 draft.

    At his best, Smith-Njigba combines near-Wilson slipperiness upon his release with Olave-like open-field speed, plus a willingness to make plays over the middle and knack for working back to help a scrambling quarterback. He's at his best running slants and quick outs from the slot, where he can easily shake off underneath defenders. Smith-Njigba is also a smooth open-field runner with seam-stretching ability. He gets by as a blocker. And while Smith-Njigba certainly benefited from the presence of Wilson and Olave, he went 15-347-3 in the 2021-season Rose Bowl against Utah, a game the others did not participate in.

    If you write off 2022 as a medical redshirt year, Smith-Njigba is a top-15 draft pick with Keenan Allen potential as a slot possession target with some big-play juice. If 2022 convinced you that Smith-Njigba is damaged goods with football character issues, you should probably just take him off your board.

    We think Smith-Njigba can be as good this year as his former Ohio State teammates were last year.

    Stat Note: Smith caught 87 passes for 1,421 yards and seven touchdowns from the slot in 2021.

    Jordan Addison
    8

    Jordan Addison

    NEW
    WR
    Height
    5'11"
    Weight
    173
    Class
    Junior
    WR
    Expand

    Addison won the Biletnikoff Award as Kenny Pickett's favorite target at Pitt in 2021 before taking the transporter beam to USC to catch 59 passes from Caleb Williams in 2022. He's a lean YAC jitterbug on screens and shallow "shake" routes who is also smooth at the top of his stem on posts/digs/outs. He demonstrates some quick-footedness upon release (though he may be a "one-too-many-moves" guy against press coverage), catches the ball well away from his body, and is a pesky blocker for his size.

    Addison looks like a cross between DeVonta Smith Lite and a skinnier Jahan Dotson. He'd be a can't-miss top-15 prospect if he were an inch taller, about 15 pounds heavier, showed more as a route-runner, and/or gained a half-step more downfield separation against better competition.

    Like many of the top receiver prospects in this class, Addison falls short of the tape-measure prototypes and has lots of schemed-up get-him-the-ball highlights from NFL-caliber quarterbacks in his portfolio, making him a tricky eval. But Addison has taken over games for two different programs over the past two seasons, and he could contribute right away as either a vertical threat or a crafty slot receiver.

    Stat Note: In 2021 for Pitt, Addison ranked fifth in the nation in targets (143), sixth in receptions (100), fourth in receiving yards (1,593) and tied for first in receiving touchdowns (17).

    Jalin Hyatt
    9

    Jalin Hyatt

    NEW
    WR
    Height
    6'0"
    Weight
    176
    Class
    Junior
    WR
    Expand

    Hyatt caught 67 passes for 1,267 yards and 15 touchdowns, and every one of those catches was: a) a wheel route from a stack formation; b) a stop route from the slot with a safety in off coverage; c) a receiver screen; or d) some chicanery where the Vols hid Hyatt in the backfield for a boot pass.

    OK, that last paragraph was an exaggeration. Hyatt can fly, changes direction smoothly, and looks well-built despite being listed in the 177-pound range. There's just very little evidence of him running an NFL route against tight man coverage and getting real separation. Hyatt's five-touchdown star turn against Alabama is full of the schemed-up stuff listed above (though, again, his ability to obliterate a safety's cushion is on full display) and he was a non-factor against Georgia, going 6-63 on short targets in the second half of a blowout.

    Hyatt's highlight reel looks like prime DeSean Jackson, but it's not clear what he'll accomplish in an offense that isn't scheming up mismatches for him. Hyatt's a Day 2 vertical threat that some team might overdraft in the first round because the NFL always feels the need for speed.

    Stat Notes: Hyatt finished second in the nation to Ohio State's Marvin Harrison Jr. with 717 yards on passes that traveled 15-plus air yards. That yardage came on just 16 catches for a staggering 44.8 yards per deep reception.

    Hyatt was credited with just three broken tackles and five missed tackles in 2022.

    Kenny McIntosh
    10

    Kenny McIntosh

    NEW
    RB
    Height
    6'0"
    Weight
    210
    Class
    Senior
    RB
    Expand

    The draft world held its breath on the first day of Senior Bowl practice, when McIntosh tried to pounce on a loose football and ended up being helped off the field. Fortunately, one of the biggest names in Mobile was back on the practice field the next day, demonstrating the burst that should make him a big-play threat in the NFL.

    McIntosh began his Bulldogs career backing up D'Andre Swift, Brian Herrien, James Cook, and Zahir White in 2019. He finally inherited a featured role after Cook and White left in 2021, but still split carries with Daijun Edwards and Kendall Milton.

    Such is life on the Georgia running back assembly line. There's a reason McIntosh played a meaningful role for two national championship teams. There's also a reason why he didn't muscle more carries away from Cook and White.

    McIntosh is well-built and fast. He'll follow his convoy patiently and explode through the hole. His gone-in-a-heartbeat acceleration was on full display during Senior Bowl practices. He's a fine receiver in the flats, with nine catches for 117 yards against Oregon in the 2022 season opener and a 5-56-1 receiving statline against Ohio State. He can look like Cook Lite when taking a jet sweep or when he gets a head of open-field speed.

    Unfortunately, McIntosh is an upright runner who can be too easy to bring down, and he lacks the traits to generate yardage that's not blocked up for him. His college film is all too full of uneventful Saturday afternoons.

    McIntosh projects as a multi-purpose committee back, albeit one who will produce two or three splash plays per month. Explosiveness, receiving chops, and a Georgia pedigree will ensure that he gets a chance at a meaty role in an offense.

    Stat Note: McIntosh ranked 11th in the SEC in broken/missed tackles per attempt at 25.3% (minimum 50 carries). However, his 3.0 yards after contact per attempt ranked 23rd, below teammates Edwards and Milton.

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