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Quick Reads Decade in Review: QB Totals

New England Patriots QB Tom Brady and New Orleans Saints QB Drew Brees
Photo: USA Today Sports Images

Welcome back to Quick Reads' Decade in Review. Last time we looked at the best and worst quarterback games of the past 10 years. Today we're going to look at total DYAR in the 2010s to show who helped (or hurt) their teams the most. We're also going to separate passing and rushing info to see who was most effective with their arms, their legs, or both.


Decade Totals

We went back and accumulated passing, rushing, and receiving DYAR in every regular-season game for every player in the league in the last 10 years. By total DYAR, here are the most valuable quarterbacks since 2010. Games and DYAR-per-game numbers are also given so you can see which of these players were most effective in the fewest outings.

Best Quarterbacks, Total DYAR, 2010-2019
Name G Cmp% Avg. TD Int Sk Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
DYAR/G
Drew Brees 153 69.5% 7.80 345 127 248 14,933 14,734 209 -9 97.6
Tom Brady 156 64.2% 7.58 316 80 281 14,057 13,871 166 20 90.1
Aaron Rodgers 142 64.7% 7.75 305 63 355 11,436 10,676 767 -7 80.5
Matt Ryan 159 66.3% 7.56 283 122 333 11,323 10,965 340 18 71.2
Philip Rivers 160 65.2% 7.81 291 153 343 10,100 10,177 -72 -6 63.1
Ben Roethlisberger 131 64.8% 7.73 236 110 261 9,564 9,454 112 -2 73.0
Matthew Stafford 139 63.1% 7.29 243 114 323 7,346 7,275 86 -15 52.8
Russell Wilson 128 64.5% 7.87 227 68 347 7,302 6,371 943 -12 57.1
Peyton Manning 74 66.4% 7.66 173 70 88 6,722 6,767 -44 0 90.8
Tony Romo 73 66.6% 7.72 141 62 149 4,871 4,826 52 -7 66.7
Andy Dalton 133 62.0% 7.10 204 118 278 4,176 3,928 241 7 31.4
Alex Smith 123 64.3% 7.17 156 58 307 4,162 3,724 453 -15 33.8
Carson Palmer 101 62.0% 7.49 166 107 206 4,139 4,178 -39 0 41.0
Kirk Cousins 93 66.9% 7.66 155 71 174 4,132 4,092 55 -15 44.4
Andrew Luck 86 60.8% 7.19 171 83 174 3,966 3,449 518 -1 46.1
Dak Prescott 64 65.8% 7.62 97 36 136 3,728 3,329 404 -5 58.2
Eli Manning 147 62.0% 7.21 241 156 261 3,724 3,723 1 0 25.3
Derek Carr 94 64.0% 6.88 143 62 171 3,653 3,762 -88 -22 38.9
Patrick Mahomes 31 65.9% 8.56 76 18 45 3,513 3,405 108 0 113.3
Cam Newton 125 59.6% 7.30 182 108 291 3,074 2,192 867 14 24.6

Your most valuable quarterback of the decade is Drew Brees of the New Orleans Saints, the NFL's all-time leader in completions, yards, and touchdowns. In second place is Tom Brady of the New England Patriots, who is also in second place in each of those passing categories. It's important to note that these numbers are for the regular season only. In most cases, the gap in these tables from one player to the next was so large that it wasn't worth looking up what effect a handful of playoff games might have had. In this case, however, the gap was more narrow, and Brady's edge in playoff opportunities (23 games to Brees' 10) might have been enough to overcome the regular-season difference and crown him the decade's top quarterback. So we put in the legwork, and yes, as it turns out, the postseason made a difference. Brady totaled 2,770 DYAR in the playoffs, bringing his overall total to 16,827 DYAR. Brees' playoff total of 1,352 DYAR leaves him with an overall total of 16,285. However, this does not necessarily mean Brees was the lesser performer in the postseason -- he averaged 135.2 DYAR per game in the playoffs, compared to 120.4 for Brady. Any way you slice it, the margin between Brees and Brady was so close this decade that there's little reason to argue in favor of one or the other.

After our top two we have Aaron Rogers, an MVP and Super Bowl champion, then a pair of ironmen in Matt Ryan and Philip Rivers, who missed only one game between them this decade. Ben Roethlisberger won two Super Bowls himself, but neither was in this decade; his only Super Bowl appearance in the 2010s was a loss to Rodgers and the Packers after the 2010 season. And then we find Matthew Stafford, and you'd be hard-pressed to find another player with so much regular-season production but so little playoff success to show for it. Stafford has only played in three playoff games, all in the wild-card round, all on the road, and all in defeat.

Russell Wilson was devastating with his arm and even better with his legs -- his 943 rushing DYAR were most for any quarterback in the last 10 years. Peyton Manning's high ranking may surprise you considering he only had four good years in this timeframe, but those four years were really good -- his 2,446 DYAR in 2013 were the best season since 2010, and his 2010, 2012, and 2014 seasons were each ranked 32nd or better. Ironically, he won his last Super Bowl championship in the worst season of his career; his -326 combined DYAR in 2015 was the third-worst total of that season, and his -115 DYAR in the championship game against Carolina was the worst performance by a quarterback in the Super Bowl in the 2010s. (By the way, one of the two quarterbacks worse than Manning in 2015 was Nick Foles, who would win his own Super Bowl two years later because the NFL is crazy.)

The last quarterback to discuss here is Patrick Mahomes, who established himself among the greats of the decade in less than two full seasons as a starter. Game for game, he blows away anyone else in this table.

Worst Quarterbacks, Total DYAR, 2010-2019
Name G Cmp% Avg. TD Int Sk Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
DYAR/G
Blaine Gabbert 56 56.2% 6.05 48 47 138 -2253 -2,271 34 -16 -40.2
Josh Rosen 20 54.8% 5.67 12 19 61 -1532 -1,554 21 0 -76.6
DeShone Kizer 18 53.1% 5.95 11 24 42 -963 -1,018 55 0 -53.5
John Skelton 20 53.2% 6.16 15 25 47 -955 -997 43 0 -47.7
Mark Sanchez 64 57.2% 6.60 74 69 142 -911 -873 -38 0 -14.2
Jimmy Clausen 22 54.0% 5.34 7 14 43 -816 -759 -57 0 -37.1
Zach Mettenberger 14 60.3% 6.80 12 14 31 -610 -619 9 0 -43.6
Matt Cassel 63 58.6% 6.51 65 53 117 -609 -660 62 -11 -9.7
Nathan Peterman 8 52.3% 4.22 3 12 8 -574 -574 0 0 -71.7
Max Hall 6 50.0% 4.74 1 6 14 -560 -550 -10 0 -93.4
Brandon Weeden 35 57.9% 6.70 31 30 66 -545 -582 36 0 -15.6
Bryce Petty 10 53.1% 5.52 4 10 21 -516 -536 20 0 -51.6
Brock Osweiler 49 59.8% 6.37 37 31 79 -510 -545 56 -21 -10.4
Geno Smith 40 57.7% 6.82 29 36 81 -505 -532 26 1 -12.6
Cody Kessler 17 64.2% 6.35 8 5 49 -494 -505 11 0 -29.1
Ryan Lindley 10 51.1% 5.01 3 11 18 -488 -486 -1 0 -48.8
T.J. Yates 22 55.2% 6.35 10 11 36 -467 -501 34 0 -21.2
Brady Quinn 10 56.9% 5.79 2 8 21 -452 -440 -4 -7 -45.2
Dwayne Haskins 9 58.6% 6.72 7 7 29 -451 -443 -8 0 -50.1
Curtis Painter 12 54.1% 6.17 6 11 17 -459 -477 18 0 -38.3

Blaine Gabbert was the 10th overall draft pick in 2011, taken one pick before J.J. Watt, 25 picks before Andy Dalton, and 26 picks before Colin Kaepernick. He started 27 games in three seasons with the Jaguars, winning only five of them while completing 53% of his passes for 5.6 yards per throw with 22 touchdowns, 24 interceptions, and 74 sacks. Since then he has started 13 games for San Francisco, five for Arizona, and three for Tennessee, showing only modest improvement from his days in Jacksonville. Put it all together, and Gabbert has done more on the field to hurt his teams than any other quarterback of the past decade. And if 43-year-old Tom Brady misses any time this season, it will be Blaine Gabbert taking snaps for your Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2020.

In second place we have Josh Rosen, whose -1,122 combined DYAR as a rookie in 2018 were the worst single-season total we have ever measured. (Not surprisingly, the worst six seasons of the last decade were all by rookie quarterbacks: Rosen, Blake Bortles in 2014, Jared Goff in 2016, Gabbert in 2011, DeShone Kizer in 2017, and Jimmy Clausen in 2010.) His numbers in Miami last season were also below replacement level, but given Tua Tagavailoa's injury history, his job with the Dolphins looks safe for at least one more year.

Gabbert and Rosen are two of the five Cardinals quarterbacks on this list, along with Max Hall, Ryan Lindley, and John Skelton. That's the most of any franchise. The Browns are in second place with four -- Cody Kessler, DeShone Kizer, Brady Quinn, Brandon Weeden -- but that jumps to five if you include Brock Osweiler, who was on their roster at one point even though he never played in a game for them. The Cowboys, Dolphins, Jets, Texans, and Titans and had three each. This includes every team each quarterback played for, so Matt Cassel counts for the Bills, Chiefs, Cowboys, Lions, Titans, and Vikings. (And there's your reminder that the Chiefs opened the decade with Matt Cassel at quarterback and closed it with Patrick Mahomes, which is quite an upgrade.)

Overall, this is an odd list of players, because most quarterbacks who regularly stink up the joint don't last long enough to rack up deep negative numbers. So you've got an unusual mix of veterans who got for more playing time than they deserved (Gabbert, Cassel, Mark Sanchez); youngsters still hoping to redeem themselves after terrible rookie seasons (Rosen, Kizer, Dwayne Haskins); and guys who were so cover-your-eyes awful (Max Hall, Caleb Hanie, and Nathan Peterman) that they made an historical impact in just a tiny handful of starts. And no, Nathan Peterman was not the worst quarterback of the past decade, not even on a per-game basis. Max Hall didn't throw interceptions quite as often as Peterman, but he had a worse completion percentage and dwarfed him in sack rate, 15.2% to 5.8%.


Passing

While we can combine passing and rushing DYAR to measure total value, we must separate them to measure efficiency with DVOA. We calculated each quarterback's total passing DVOA over the past decade, then cut the list to those with 800 pass plays -- in theory, the minimum number of plays needed to qualify for our passing leaderboards four times, though several of our 63 qualifiers hit the mark much faster than that. That includes the most efficient passer of the past decade, your reigning Super Bowl MVP.

Best Passing DVOA, 2010-2019
Name G Cmp% Avg. TD Int Sk DVOA
Patrick Mahomes 31 65.9% 8.56 76 18 45 34.6%
Drew Brees 153 69.5% 7.80 345 127 248 24.7%
Tom Brady 156 64.2% 7.58 316 80 281 23.8%
Peyton Manning 74 66.4% 7.66 173 70 88 23.2%
Aaron Rodgers 142 64.7% 7.75 305 63 355 19.4%
Ben Roethlisberger 131 64.8% 7.73 236 110 261 17.4%
Tony Romo 73 66.6% 7.72 141 62 149 17.2%
Matt Ryan 159 66.3% 7.56 283 122 333 16.0%
Jimmy Garoppolo 42 67.5% 8.30 44 21 65 15.1%
Philip Rivers 160 65.2% 7.81 291 153 343 15.1%
Russell Wilson 128 64.5% 7.87 227 68 347 13.1%
Dak Prescott 64 65.8% 7.62 97 36 136 12.4%
Deshaun Watson 38 66.8% 8.07 71 29 125 11.8%
Matthew Stafford 139 63.1% 7.29 243 114 323 8.8%
Kirk Cousins 93 66.9% 7.66 155 71 174 7.6%
Derek Carr 94 64.0% 6.88 143 62 171 5.5%
Carson Palmer 101 62.0% 7.49 166 107 206 5.4%
Matt Schaub 78 63.3% 7.43 77 51 104 4.2%
Andrew Luck 86 60.8% 7.19 171 83 174 3.7%
Carson Wentz 56 63.8% 6.91 97 35 129 3.2%
Minimum 800 pass plays

For the most part, this is a repeat of the names in the total DYAR list, though a few younger active players (Jimmy Garoppolo, Deshaun Watson) slip in over the 800-attempt threshold. Mostly, though, this shows the brilliance of the Holy Trinity of Quarterbacks: Tom Brady, Drew Brees, and Peyton Manning, who even in the twilight of their careers (or, in Manning's case, the end) were outshone only by the brightest young passing star the league has seen since Dan Marino. It's also notable that most of the names in the top half of this table are veterans. In 2025, they'll mostly be gone, we'll be comparing Patrick Mahomes to Jimmy Garoppolo, Russell Wilson, Dak Prescott, and Deshaun Watson. And if he continues to play this much better than all of them, we're going to have burn the Hall of Fame to the ground and erect 326 busts of Mahomes instead.

At the other end of the spectrum, adding a minimum of 800 passes wipes out the Nathan Petermans and Max Halls of the world and limits our quarterbacks to those who were starters for several seasons. And among that crew, Gabbert sticks out again as by far the worst of the bunch.

Worst Passing DVOA, 2010-2019
Name G Cmp% Avg. TD Int Sk DVOA
Blaine Gabbert 56 56.2% 6.05 48 47 138 -33.4%
Josh Allen 28 56.3% 6.61 30 21 66 -21.8%
Geno Smith 40 57.7% 6.82 29 36 81 -20.4%
Brandon Weeden 35 57.9% 6.70 31 30 66 -20.3%
Mark Sanchez 64 57.2% 6.60 74 69 142 -18.0%
Sam Darnold 26 59.9% 6.89 36 28 63 -17.8%
Brock Osweiler 49 59.8% 6.37 37 31 79 -17.8%
Matt Cassel 63 58.6% 6.51 65 53 117 -17.3%
Christian Ponder 38 59.8% 6.30 38 36 95 -17.1%
Trevor Siemian 27 59.2% 6.76 30 24 66 -15.8%
Josh McCown 55 61.8% 7.08 63 42 141 -15.7%
Blake Bortles 78 59.3% 6.70 103 75 195 -15.2%
Colt McCoy 39 60.7% 6.59 29 27 89 -14.5%
Chad Henne 51 58.8% 6.69 46 49 123 -12.8%
Robert Griffin 52 63.1% 7.36 43 28 128 -10.4%
Mike Glennon 29 60.9% 6.45 36 20 65 -9.5%
Jason Campbell 38 58.7% 6.71 32 22 61 -9.1%
Matt Hasselbeck 53 61.3% 6.73 48 42 80 -8.8%
Mitchell Trubisky 41 63.4% 6.68 48 29 93 -7.7%
Sam Bradford 83 62.5% 6.56 103 61 196 -7.5%
Minimum 800 pass plays

The gap between Gabbert and Josh Allen, the second-worst passer on this list, is larger than the gap between Allen and 13th-ranked Chad Henne. The most surprising name here might be Teddy Bridgewater, who is finally getting a chance to start again in Carolina. Remember, though, that he only started for two seasons in Minnesota before tearing up his knee, and in those two years, he had a DVOA of -16.9% as a rookie and -5.1% in 2015.

If you're looking for the definitions of average and replacement-level: Eli Manning had the most passes this decade of anyone with a negative DVOA (5,326, -0.2%); Blake Bortles had the most passes of anyone with negative passing DYAR (2,634, -676).


Rushing

We didn't bother listing the decade's passing DYAR leaders because it was mostly the same as the total DYAR leaders. We will, however, list the rushing DYAR leaders here. Note that the attempts and yardage columns here DO NOT include kneeldowns:

Best Rushing DYAR, Quarterbacks, 2010-2019
Name G Att Yds TD 1D Fum Avg 1D% Fum% DYAR DYAR/G
Russell Wilson 128 606 4121 19 238 31 6.80 39.3% 5.12% 943 7.4
Cam Newton 125 853 4902 58 369 24 5.75 43.3% 2.81% 867 6.9
Aaron Rodgers 142 378 2674 19 181 14 7.07 47.9% 3.70% 767 5.4
Andrew Luck 86 246 1667 14 112 15 6.78 45.5% 6.10% 518 6.0
Michael Vick 57 284 2191 13 115 27 7.71 40.5% 9.51% 472 8.3
Alex Smith 123 367 2300 13 143 17 6.27 39.0% 4.63% 453 3.7
Blake Bortles 78 254 1795 8 122 18 7.07 48.0% 7.09% 449 5.8
Colin Kaepernick 69 333 2346 13 120 22 7.05 36.0% 6.61% 407 5.9
Dak Prescott 64 197 1273 21 94 6 6.46 47.7% 3.05% 404 6.3
Jay Cutler 100 159 1155 5 78 16 7.26 49.1% 10.06% 383 3.8
Ryan Fitzpatrick 127 363 2035 14 135 24 5.61 37.2% 6.61% 348 2.7
Matt Ryan 159 228 1267 7 103 23 5.56 45.2% 10.09% 340 2.1
Tyrod Taylor 70 289 1894 16 107 12 6.55 37.0% 4.15% 335 4.8
Josh Allen 28 179 1160 17 88 3 6.48 49.2% 1.68% 293 10.5
Ryan Tannehill 100 216 1465 10 89 26 6.78 41.2% 12.04% 278 2.8
Marcus Mariota 63 212 1433 11 91 13 6.76 42.9% 6.13% 269 4.3
Deshaun Watson 38 196 1254 14 80 4 6.40 40.8% 2.04% 243 6.4
Andy Dalton 133 290 1324 22 118 17 4.57 40.7% 5.86% 241 1.8
Drew Brees 153 109 400 16 55 6 3.67 50.5% 5.50% 209 1.4
Josh Freeman 52 143 831 4 75 11 5.81 52.4% 7.69% 205 3.9
Kneeldowns removed from rushing statistics

We mentioned that Russell Wilson had the most rushing DYAR by any quarterback in the 2010s, but at first glance here it may be hard to figure out why. Cam Newton, the second-ranked quarterback, had nearly 800 more yards on the ground, with dominant leads in first downs and touchdowns and fewer fumbles. Nearly half of those first downs, however, came in short-yardage situations -- 47% came with less than 4 yards to go, and on average Newton only needed 4.9 yards for a first down. Only 21% of Wilson's first downs came in those short-yardage situations, and on average he needed 7.2 yards for a conversion. In short, while Newton was making the most of his relatively easy opportunities, Wilson was constantly bailing the Seahawks out of no-win situations, routinely turning third-and-forever into first-and-10 with one highlight scramble after another.

Josh Allen also sticks out here -- he has the most DYAR per game in this table, and he makes the total value leaderboard in only two years as a starter, so he's kind of the rushing version of Patrick Mahomes, as bizarre as that comparison sounds. But it's justified -- Allen leads all players here with 41.4 yards per game and a fumble rate of only 1.68%, and only two players can top his first-down rate.

We also compiled rushing DVOA leaders, with a minimum of 32 non-kneeldown carries. That may not sound like very much, but again, it's enough to theoretically meet our seasonal leaderboards four times. That leaves us with 79 qualifying runners. It was not terribly surprising to see Wilson and Newton rank one-two in rushing DYAR in the 2010s, or to see Aaron Rodgers, Andrew Luck, and Michael Vick following them. But when we saw the decade's leader in rushing DVOA, we about fell out of our collective chairs.

Best Rushing DVOA, Quarterbacks, 2010-2019
Name G Att Yds TD 1D Fum Avg 1D% Fum% DVOA
Jay Cutler 100 159 1155 5 78 16 7.26 49.1% 10.06% 42.0%
Brett Hundley 18 39 317 2 25 3 8.13 64.1% 7.69% 40.9%
Joe Webb 102 48 328 4 20 0 6.83 41.7% 0.00% 31.7%
Andrew Luck 86 246 1667 14 112 15 6.78 45.5% 6.10% 29.3%
Jake Locker 30 87 655 5 39 7 7.53 44.8% 8.05% 29.2%
Aaron Rodgers 142 378 2674 19 181 14 7.07 47.9% 3.70% 28.5%
Dak Prescott 64 197 1273 21 94 6 6.46 47.7% 3.05% 26.1%
Blake Bortles 78 254 1795 8 122 18 7.07 48.0% 7.09% 23.5%
Case Keenum 67 85 475 6 48 4 5.59 56.5% 4.71% 22.1%
Drew Stanton 32 32 206 1 15 0 6.44 46.9% 0.00% 21.6%
Michael Vick 57 284 2191 13 115 27 7.71 40.5% 9.51% 21.3%
Drew Brees 153 109 400 16 55 6 3.67 50.5% 5.50% 21.1%
Russell Wilson 128 606 4121 19 238 31 6.80 39.3% 5.12% 20.6%
Josh Allen 28 179 1160 17 88 3 6.48 49.2% 1.68% 18.8%
Matt Ryan 159 228 1267 7 103 23 5.56 45.2% 10.09% 17.7%
Johnny Manziel 15 41 264 1 12 0 6.44 29.3% 0.00% 17.4%
Jeff Driskel 12 42 286 3 17 0 6.81 40.5% 0.00% 17.1%
Terrelle Pryor 51 99 650 4 35 2 6.57 35.4% 2.02% 16.9%
Ryan Tannehill 100 216 1465 10 89 26 6.78 41.2% 12.04% 15.8%
Josh McCown 55 98 559 10 48 14 5.70 49.0% 14.29% 15.5%
Minimum 32 Runs
Kneeldowns removed from rushing statistics

Jay … Cutler? Jay Cutler? As in Smokin' Jay Cutler? The same Jay Cutler who made this face when he came out of retirement to play for the Dolphins?

And then had this to say when asked why he was returning to the NFL?

 

I would probably say my wife, Kristin (Cavallari), probably talked me into it more than anybody else could. … Yeah, I think she got tired of me around the house.

 

And then, when his playing days really ended and his wife really did get tired of him around the house, was reportedly described as "this lazy, unmotivated guy?" That Jay Cutler was the most efficient running quarterback of the 2010s?

The first thing you must realize is that DYAR and DVOA do not include kneeldowns, and Cutler's standard rushing stats are turfed because he took a ton of knees -- 74 of them for a combined loss of 69 yards, to be specific. All told, 32% of Cutler's official rush attempts this decade were simple kneels to kill clock. Of the top 20 quarterbacks in rushing DYAR, only Drew Brees (54% -- the Saints won a lot more games than Cutler's Bears or Dolphins) was kneeling down on a higher share of his rushing attempts. Take away those kneeldowns, and Cutler averaged a Vick-esque 7.3 yards per carry, earning a first down nearly half the time. And Cutler, like Wilson, was often making something out of nothing -- only 24% of his rushing first downs came with less than 4 yards to go, and on average he needed 6.9 yards to convert them.

(By the way, if you're looking for Lamar Jackson in those tables, you won't find him. As we covered in our 2018 Year in Review, Jackson's advanced rushing numbers as a rookie were shockingly awful. Even without kneeldowns, he averaged only 5.3 yards per carry, compared to the average of 6.1 for quarterbacks that season. And he fumbled 10 times on running plays, six more than any other quarterback. Many of those fumbles were likely botched handoffs or option mesh points, so blame could be split between Jackson and his running backs, but officially those plays go down as fumbles for the quarterback. Jackson rebounded strongly in his second season and will likely dominate this category when we get to the 2020s Decade in Review. For now, Jackson has 289 runs for 161 DYAR, with a DVOA of -1.9%.)

The quarterbacks with the worst rushing numbers in DYAR and DVOA aren't very meaningful. These are basically players who never really run in the first place, so when they fumble a snap or a handoff, their advanced stats nosedive, and they never get the first downs or long runs needed to overcome that. But since we had these numbers calculated anyway, we thought we'd go ahead and run them anyway. Enjoy the data dump!

Worst Rushing DYAR, Quarterbacks, 2010-2019
Name G Att Yds TD 1D Fum Avg 1D% Fum% RDYAR DYAR/G
Derek Carr 94 116 566 3 42 20 4.88 36.2% 17.24% -88 -0.9
Chad Henne 51 85 356 2 30 11 4.19 35.3% 12.94% -81 -1.6
Philip Rivers 160 170 466 1 40 24 2.74 23.5% 14.12% -72 -0.4
Brian Hoyer 64 43 136 1 16 6 3.16 37.2% 13.95% -65 -1.0
Jimmy Clausen 22 34 106 0 8 9 3.12 23.5% 26.47% -57 -2.6
Matt Barkley 14 7 1 0 0 3 0.14 0.0% 42.86% -55 -4.0
Thaddeus Lewis 7 19 60 1 6 3 3.16 31.6% 15.79% -49 -7.0
Matt Flynn 31 24 102 1 8 3 4.25 33.3% 12.50% -46 -1.5
Peyton Manning 74 30 39 1 5 9 1.30 16.7% 30.00% -44 -0.6
Sean Mannion 13 7 9 0 4 3 1.29 57.1% 42.86% -43 -3.3
Nick Mullens 9 7 -2 0 1 0 -0.29 14.3% 0.00% -43 -4.7
Jared Goff 54 67 260 6 19 2 3.88 28.4% 2.99% -40 -0.7
Carson Palmer 101 87 272 3 33 20 3.13 37.9% 22.99% -39 -0.4
Kyle Boller 7 13 60 0 4 3 4.62 30.8% 23.08% -39 -5.6
Mark Sanchez 64 100 386 10 36 21 3.86 36.0% 21.00% -38 -0.6
Mike Glennon 29 34 123 0 7 12 3.62 20.6% 35.29% -38 -1.3
Matt Moore 39 34 110 2 8 6 3.24 23.5% 17.65% -34 -0.9
Tom Savage 13 9 16 0 2 2 1.78 22.2% 22.22% -27 -2.0
Jake Delhomme 6 4 3 0 1 1 0.75 25.0% 25.00% -26 -4.4
Will Grier 2 7 22 0 2 1 3.14 28.6% 14.29% -23 -11.6
Kneeldowns removed from rushing statistics

 

Worst Rushing DVOA, Quarterbacks, 2010-2019
Name G Att Yds TD 1D Fum Avg 1D% Fum% RDVOA
Brian Hoyer 64 43 136 1 16 6 3.16 37.2% 13.95% -39.0%
Chad Henne 51 85 356 2 30 11 4.19 35.3% 12.94% -30.3%
Derek Carr 94 116 566 3 42 20 4.88 36.2% 17.24% -29.3%
Philip Rivers 160 170 466 1 40 24 2.74 23.5% 14.12% -23.3%
Carson Palmer 101 87 272 3 33 20 3.13 37.9% 22.99% -22.1%
Jared Goff 54 67 260 6 19 2 3.88 28.4% 2.99% -22.0%
Jimmy Garoppolo 42 53 158 2 24 4 2.98 45.3% 7.55% -20.4%
Mark Sanchez 64 100 386 10 36 21 3.86 36.0% 21.00% -19.7%
Sam Bradford 83 86 404 2 25 17 4.70 29.1% 19.77% -15.2%
Trevor Siemian 27 42 204 1 14 4 4.86 33.3% 9.52% -13.7%
Eli Manning 147 89 392 4 30 16 4.40 33.7% 17.98% -12.3%
Tim Tebow 35 190 996 12 60 7 5.24 31.6% 3.68% -11.2%
Teddy Bridgewater 44 95 480 4 38 3 5.05 40.0% 3.16% -9.3%
Blaine Gabbert 56 145 660 3 50 15 4.55 34.5% 10.34% -8.8%
Taysom Hill 37 64 352 3 24 1 5.50 37.5% 1.56% -7.2%
Geno Smith 40 128 678 7 46 11 5.30 35.9% 8.59% -6.6%
Sam Darnold 26 53 228 3 23 1 4.30 43.4% 1.89% -6.5%
Jacoby Brissett 38 114 593 9 42 9 5.20 36.8% 7.89% -5.3%
Kirk Cousins 93 144 617 15 70 16 4.28 48.6% 11.11% -5.3%
Baker Mayfield 30 51 287 3 23 3 5.63 45.1% 5.88% -3.9%
Minimum 32 runs
Kneeldowns removed from rushing statistics

 


Receiving

Yes, we calculated advanced receiving stats for quarterbacks. No, we're not going to bother running or analyzing them. Suffice to say that Taysom Hill led all quarterbacks with 84 receiving DYAR (29 targets, 22 receptions, 238 yards, six touchdowns), while Joe Webb was last with -37 (25 targets, 10 receptions, 74 yards, no touchdowns). If you're wondering about Terrelle Pryor, we essentially split him in two, counting him as a quarterback until 2014 and a wide receiver after that. For the record, Pryor amassed a total of 221 DYAR this decade (216 targets, 115 receptions, 1,563 yards, seven touchdowns). No other quarterback saw more than four targets, and only Russell Wilson had even that many.


Notable Seasons

We're not going to go in-depth on the best and worst seasons of the decade because A) we just wrote about that for ESPN+ in December, and B) all that information is freely available elsewhere on the site for anyone who wants to compile it. But a few bullet points:

  • The best quarterback season of the decade was Peyton Manning in 2013 when he totaled 2,446 DYAR (2,475 passing, -30 rushing).
  • Tom Brady was the only quarterback to top 2,000 total DYAR twice -- 2,051 in 2011 and 2,092 a year later in 2012.
  • Brees was the only quarterback to go over 1,000 total DYAR in every season in the 2010s. Brady and Matt Ryan were tied for second with eight 1,000-DYAR seasons each.
  • As previously mentioned, Josh Rosen's -1,122 combined DYAR as a rookie with the Cardinals in 2018 were the worst single-season total of this or any other decade on record.
  • While no quarterback ever dropped below -500 combined DYAR more than once, a few had multiple seasons at -250 DYAR or worse. Blaine Gabbert did it three times -- in 2011, 2012, and 2013. Matt Cassel, Josh McCown, Josh Rosen, Mark Sanchez, John Skelton, and Brandon Weeden did it twice each.
  • Joe Flacco was the only quarterback with four seasons with 200-plus pass plays and negative total DYAR. Cassel, Gabbert, and Case Keenum did it three times each.

Comments

35 comments, Last at 15 Jun 2020, 9:37am

1 Do you have the playoff…

Do you have the playoff numbers? Can you share them?

After all, DYAR is a cumulative value stat. Producing in a playoff game is without a shadow of a doubt more valuable than the same production in a regular season game.

Playoff games really happened. Excluding them from a decade compilation of DYAR seems to miss the point of DYAR.

2 Time consuming, unfortunately

Unfortunately, the playoff numbers are in a different place than the regular-season numbers so it would be very time-consuming to compute the playoff totals for the decade. We're still working on getting everything in one big database that would allow us to do such things.

3 I did not see Colin…

I did not see Colin Kaepernick's name anywhere on the worst QB's list. How did his numbers compare to the Best and worst QB's?

10 Don't know about burned…

Don't know about burned bridges but he would just be a clipboard holder in Baltimore, Seattle and Houston.  That would not be a good look for him.  I don't know where he would be a good system fit and have a shot at starting.

6 And then we find Matthew…

And then we find Matthew Stafford, and you'd be hard-pressed to find another player with so much regular-season production but so little playoff success to show for it.

I mean aside from any number of other Lions players.

It's not like Stafford's DYAR/gm is much different from his regular season numbers.

16 Max Hall started three games…

Max Hall started three games for the Cardinals in 2010 and hasn't played since, so not many outside the most dedicated fantasy football players would remember him at this point. He was a three-year starter at BYU, but he went on his Mormon mission before that, so he hit the NFL as a 25-year-old rookie. In his one season, he was sacked 14 times in 92 dropbacks. For comparison's sake, last year Drew Brees was sacked 12 times in 390 dropbacks. 

9 One quarterback whom I had…

One quarterback whom I had always thought was a bad quarterback (bourne out in the worse passing dvoa section) but I thought would have a decent rushing dvoa was Ponder, who I remember having some decent runs, but that could just be anecdotal.   Obviously nothing to offset his lack of passing acumen.  

Looks like he had 126 rushes in those 4 years, so barring a ton of kneeldowns he should have qualified for the minimum, but (again, with standard stats, kneels included) looks like he was only really decent his rookie year, his YPC dropped off after that, and he had fewer runs that year.   And he fumbled a fair amount, though not sure how many were on dropbacks vs runs.   I guess if I had to guess, he was better on designed runs than broken plays where he tried to run

19 Oops

I was looking at Bortles.

22 Brees 2010

The database has Drew Brees' 2010 at 1061 DYAR. What am I missing?

 

 

23 The links (and years) are…

In reply to by KaosTheory

The links (and years) are wrong. 

Vince, you need to double check this. Are you just referring to the wrong seasons, or is the whole dataset off by a year?

24 Whoops

Apologies. It looks like there were some errors on the "best seasons" section, I'm fixing those now. Vince is looking into whether he may have used incorrect numbers for 2010 and 2011 and we'll figure it out.

25 No problem. Stuff happens. …

In reply to by Aaron Schatz

No problem. Stuff happens. 

Assuming the dataset is correct... it’s fascinating how close in value the top two QBs were for this decade. As always, when things are this close, we need to consider context. Who had what supporting cast? Who played in winter weather? 

We probably don’t need to consider how many games each played and with what score differentials: DYAR is a cumulative stat and “most valuable” is a cumulative concept, and doesn’t have to care about why a QB threw more or riskier passes.

Me, I’d go with Brady. Playoffs do count, so he wins on DYAR as a measure of total value. And he played in the tougher conditions, too. But I have no real quarrel with anyone who wants to go with Brees. The old guys are that close.

As for Mahomes, that’s the problem with “X of the decade”. But if he can keep it up for as long as Brady did, he’ll get the next decade, for sure.

26 Jets qbs

Amazingly out of 163 games one of the 10 worst passers started 123 for the jets. And that doesn’t include Greg McElroy, Bryce petty or Luke falk! Outside of fitzys outlier of outliers it has been a bruta decade 

27 ARRRGGGHHH

Yes, I calculated this with faulty information for 2011. I will be redoing the tables on this piece this afternoon. This will result in a bit of shuffling in the tables, but it's mostly the same names in slightly different locations. And the extreme outliers discussed in the story -- Brees, Brady, Gabbert, Wilson, Newton, Cutler -- all finish at the top or bottom of their respective tables, so yay.

32 I'm actually not all that…

I'm actually not all that shocked about Jay Cutler being the most efficient rusher.  He was always at his best when he was allowed to get of the pocket and throw on the run.  Unfortunately, unlike Mike Shanahan, none of the Bears' coaches ever figured that out.

 

 

34 Two of the six worst played at Notre Dame.

Brady Quinn also made the bottom 20.  Any chance you run this for 1980-1989 (or estimate it) or even farther back so I can wash the bad taste out of my mouth?