The Few Strengths and Many Flaws of Taysom Hill

Dallas Cowboys DT Carlos Watkins
Dallas Cowboys DT Carlos Watkins
Photo: USA Today Sports Images

NFL Week 13 - November 22, 2021: Taysom Hill signs a unique contract extension with the New Orleans Saints that could be worth up to $95 million if he becomes their starting quarterback over the following four years.

December 2, 2021: Taysom Hill starts at quarterback for the Saints and shows little indication that he deserves the job.

If you're not familiar, here's a quick recap of Hill's story: After a Mormon mission, he suffered a bevy of injuries at BYU, then entered the NFL as an undrafted rookie at age 27. He spent the summer of 2017 as a training camp arm in Green Bay, then joined New Orleans as a special teamer. The Saints worked him into their offense as a multipurpose tool, then gave him four starts at quarterback in place of an injured Drew Brees last season. He underwhelmed in those four starts, finishing the year with a DVOA of -19.0% that would have fallen outside the top 30 of full-season qualifiers. Still, Hill entered training camp this year in a battle with Jameis Winston to replace the retired Brees, even though Winston had a much stronger resume—in five seasons as Tampa Bay's starter, he had never produced a DVOA worse than -9.8%, not even in his notorious 30-interception campaign in 2019.

It's no surprise, then, that Winston won the job, and early returns were quite positive. Through seven weeks, the Saints were 4-2 (they had a bye in Week 6) and Winston ranked in the middle of the pack in both DVOA and DYAR. In a key divisional matchup against Tampa Bay in Week 8, the defense came up big, forcing three Tom Brady turnovers (including a game-clinching pick-six) in a 36-27 victory. The win left New Orleans in strong position to earn a wild-card berth, or maybe even surpass the Buccaneers for the division crown. Winston left that game with a knee injury, but he was still able to celebrate with his teammates in the locker room.

Unfortunately, that victory celebration was the high point of the Saints' year. Winston had suffered a torn ACL, ending his season. Then things got confusing. With Hill recovering from an early-season concussion, the Saints handed the starting job to Trevor Siemian … but Hill was still healthy enough to play 20 combined snaps on offense and special teams against Atlanta in Week 9, and 30 more against Tennessee in Week 10. At that point Hill suffered a foot injury that knocked him entirely out of Weeks 11 and 12. Siemian started each of those four games, all losses, as the Saints plummeted to 5-6.

Last week, with New Orleans hosting Dallas on Thursday night, Hill was deemed healthy enough to start at quarterback. He had one good drive in the first half, hitting Juwan Johnson for 27 yards on first-and-15, scrambling for a first down on third-and-8, and throwing a 24-yard touchdown to Lil'Jordan Humphrey. Otherwise, however, the Saints looked inept, punting three times and missing a 56-yard field goal attempt before Hill was intercepted in Dallas territory. Fortunately for Hill, Dak Prescott and the Cowboys weren't doing much better against a Saints defense that remains stout. The game was still within reach at 13-7.

New Orleans cut into that deficit on their first drive of the third quarter. Hill had four carries for 42 yards on that drive, but in scoring range, he threw three straight incompletions, forcing the Saints to settle for a field goal. They had cut the lead to 13-10, but that was the closest they would get for the rest of the day. Their next three drives all ended in punts, and the three after that all ended in interceptions. On their last possession, Hill threw a garbage-time touchdown on which Deonte Harris did all the work:

The Final Numbers

Hill finished with a woeful statline even beyond the four picks. He completed fewer than half his passes, and though he averaged a respectable 6.4 yards per throw, more than one-quarter of his 264 yards came on that meaningless late touchdown. He was also sacked twice. Add it all up and Hill had -131 passing DYAR, worst of all players in what was a pretty bad week for quarterbacks across the league.

However, he is not last in our tables this week. As we said in our lede, Hill showed little indication that he deserves a starting job, but "little" does not mean "zero." Most of New Orleans' points were scored after big Hill runs, and he finished with 11 carries for 101 yards and 39 rushing DYAR. Those totals are not skewed by one or two big runs; nine of Hill's carries counted as successful plays, and six of them moved the chains. That includes conversions on all three of this runs on third down. Only one other quarterback has hit 39 rushing DYAR in a game this year: Jalen Hurts, who did it in Week 2 (with updated opponent adjustments) and again in Week 11.

As you might imagine, it's quite rare to run for 100 yards while throwing four interceptions. Per Stathead, Hill is only the second player in league history to pull off that mixed bag of a feat, and the first since Denver's Norris Weese against Chicago in 1976.

The Ballad of Norris Weese

Weese didn't even start that Bears game, only coming in after Craig Penrose threw his own interception, a pick-six at that. Despite all those turnovers, the Broncos beat the Bears 28-14, mostly because their defense limited Chicago quarterback Bob Avellini to 2-of-17 passing on a wintry day at Soldier Field. 1970s football was wild, man.

Weese had a fascinating career but a tragically short life. He followed Archie Manning at Ole Miss, then played professionally in the World Football League for The Hawaiians. (Seriously, that was their whole name—"The Hawaiians.") He joined the Broncos for four years, coming off the bench to play most of the second half against Dallas in Super Bowl XII. He won the starting job from Craig Morton in 1979, but Morton won it back six games later (quarterback carousels were a common thing in ye olden days). Weese suffered a knee injury and never played again after that season.

There's not a lot of Weese to be found on YouTube—a pair of failed rallies against Minnesota and Pittsburgh; highlights from a game against Seattle, when Weese was benched and Morton turned a 34-10 deficit into 37-34 win (Weese still started the next week); and a pair of clips of Weese being hit really hard, including once on a lariat worthy of Stan Hansen. Sadly, Weese passed away due to bone cancer in 1995. He was only 43 years old.

Dropping the criteria to four interceptions with at least 75 rushing yards doesn't add many names. That has only been done seven times, with Hill being the first to do it since Michael Vick with Philadelphia in 2011. There have been 19 games where a quarterback ran for 50 yards with four interceptions. Lamar Jackson did it against Cleveland only four days before Hill's outing against Dallas. Tobin Rote, a Lions quarterback in the 1950s, is the only player to do it twice.

Back to New Orleans…

What does any of this mean for Hill and the Saints? Despite their five-game losing streak, they remain only one game out of the playoffs in the paper-thin NFC. Our playoff odds give them a 16.2% chance of qualifying for the postseason, thanks largely to a soft schedule—four of their five remaining opponents (the Jets, Dolphins, Falcons, and Panthers) currently have losing records, with the exception being the Buccaneers, who will host New Orleans in Tampa in Week 15. So long as the Saints don't fall behind early, their defense and Hill's scrambling talents give them a chance to beat bad teams. Winning a playoff berth would likely mean defeat in a rematch against the Bucs or Cowboys in January, but there is still a glimmer of hope.

The real question is what happens in 2022. Winston will be a free agent (although technically he has two voidable years on his contract), and the Hill extension suggests that the Saints have little interest in bringing him back. When you compare the two, it's a baffling decision. Due to Winston's penchant for negative plays, Hill may have once been seen as the safer choice, but after his meltdown against Dallas, his career interception rate (4.4%) is now higher than Winston's (3.3%). So is his sack rate (9.0% to 6.3%). And it's hard to argue that Hill has more room to develop when he's already 31 years old. That makes him four years older than Winston, two years older than Teddy Bridgewater, and one year older than Jimmy Garoppolo, all of whom are viewed as finished products and likely to be on new teams next season.

It's worth noting that Hill's contract is cut by more than half in the event he is not the team's long-term answer at quarterback. In that case, he would "only" earn $10 million as a backup QB/gadget player/special-teamer. But the structure of his deal indicates that the Saints will at least try to go forward with a quarterback who has fewer career touchdown passes than either Walter Payton or LaDainian Tomlinson and is now entering the decline phase of his career. If nothing else, the next five weeks could show us whether or not that's really a good idea.

 

Quarterbacks
Rk
Player
Team
CP/AT
Yds
TD
INT
Sacks
Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Opp
1.
Tua Tagovailoa MIA
30/41
244
2
0
2
110
113
-3
NYG
This is the lowest DYAR by a quarterback at the top of our tables since Nick Mullens (Really! Nick Mullens!) finished first with 107 DYAR in Week 15 of 2018. The Dolphins offense is built around RPOs and short passes designed to generate YAC, but that's not how it worked out on Sunday. Tagovailoa's average completion gained 2.4 yards after the catch, fewest in the NFL this week. Unfortunately for Miami, they may have no other options—Tagovailoa still has severe limitations in dropback passing, as shown by our analyst Derrik Klassen on Twitter here and here and here. Regardless, Tagovailoa had the best results this week on throws to the left, going 14-of-16 for 93 yards and two touchdowns.
2.
Justin Herbert LAC
26/35
317
3
1
4
108
103
5
CIN
Herbert threw deep often, and he threw deep well. His average pass traveled 10.7 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, most in the league. And he led all NFL passers in DYAR on deep balls, going 5-of-9 for 188 yards with one touchdown and one interception.
3.
Ben Roethlisberger PIT
21/31
236
2
0
1
87
87
0
BAL
The Steelers only scored three points in the first three quarters on Sunday, but rallied for a 20-19 win. That's largely because Roethlisberger was the week's best passer in the fourth quarter, going 9-of-10 for 129 yards and two touchdowns with one sack, plus a 5-yard DPI.
4.
Tom Brady TB
38/51
368
4
1
0
71
71
0
ATL
Brady loses a league-high 59 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He was the week's best passer out of a huddle (20-of-25 for 186 yards and three touchdowns), but the worst without one (18-of-26 for 117 yards with one touchdown and one pick-six).
5.
Kirk Cousins MIN
30/40
340
2
0
3
67
64
3
DET
Perfection, thy name be ... Kirk Cousins? Cousins completed each of his 10 throws down the middle against Detroit, picking up 143 yards and two touchdowns in the process. Nine of those completions picked up first downs; the other was a 10-yard gain on second-and-20. He would rank even higher, but he loses 49 DYAR due to opponent adjustments.
6.
Carson Wentz IND
16/22
158
1
0
1
67
66
0
HOU
Wentz threw only one deep pass, an incompletion targeted at Nyheim Hines (of all people) 36 yards downfield in the second quarter. He did not have a good day on third downs, going 2-of-6 for 21 yards with a sack. At least both of those completions moved the chains.
7.
Matthew Stafford LAR
26/38
295
3
0
1
64
60
4
JAX
Life was easy for Stafford on Sunday. He was playing a bad defense, one of three quarterbacks to lose 50-plus DYAR due to opponent adjustments. And he rarely had far to go; his average dropback came with a league-low 6.9 yards to go for a first down. He was the week's best passer in the third quarter, going 9-of-11 for 139 yards and two touchdowns.
8.
Kyler Murray ARI
11/15
123
2
0
1
59
52
7
CHI
Murray had the week's best results on throws to his right, going 6-of-7 for 81 yards and two touchdowns.
9.
Gardner Minshew PHI
20/25
242
2
0
2
58
56
2
NYJ
Minshew was one of three quarterbacks to lose 50-plus DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He was still the week's best passer outside the red zone, but had a disastrous day inside the Jets' 20-yard line. He only had three dropbacks in that part of the field: a completion for a 2-yard loss on second-and-10; another completion for a 2-yard loss on third-and-12; and a sack-fumble on third-and-5.
10.
Jimmy Garoppolo SF
20/30
299
2
2
1
57
54
3
SEA
Garoppolo had a bad day on throws to his wide receivers, going 6-of-12 for 79 yards with an interception. Only three of those completions produced first downs.
11.
Josh Allen BUF
15/30
145
1
0
2
48
52
-3
NE
12.
Jared Goff DET
25/39
296
3
1
3
39
51
-13
MIN
Goff was successful on a league-best 58% of his dropbacks on Sunday. Really! Jared Goff! Not a lot of those successful plays, however, came on third/fourth down, when he went 4-of-8 for 43 yards with three conversions (inluding a touchdown) with three sacks, one fumble, and one interception. He was much better in the second quarter, however: 11-of-13 for 167 yards and two touchdowns.
Rk
Player
Team
CP/AT
Yds
TD
INT
Sacks
Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Opp
13.
Taylor Heinicke WAS
23/30
196
2
1
1
39
36
2
LV
The bad news for Heinicke is that he was rotten on second downs: 7-of-8 for 38 yards with only one first down and a sack. The good news is that he was pretty good on the ensuing third downs: 6-of-8 for only 42 yards, but five conversions (including a touchdown), with one interception.
14.
Dak Prescott DAL
26/40
238
1
1
1
18
18
0
NO
Prescott threw a dozen failed completions, tied for most in the league. That's partly because he was the week's worst passer on throws to running backs, going 4-of-7 for 5 yards. None of those completions gained more than 2 yards or counted as a successful play, let alone gaining a first down.
15.
Derek Carr LV
28/38
249
0
0
2
3
-8
10
WAS
Carr had a quiet day inside the Washington 40-yard line, going 4-of-8 for 25 yards and no touchdowns, with a 9-yard DPI.
16.
Zach Wilson NYJ
23/37
226
2
1
2
-6
-3
-3
PHI
Wilson was very effective in the red zone, going 5-of-6 for 29 yards and a pair of touchdowns.
N/A
Mac Jones NE
2/3
19
0
0
0
-6
11
-17
BUF
We usually don't include quarterbacks who throw fewer than eight passes in our tables, but we knew we would get questions about Jones after New England almost completely removed the pass from their playbook on Monday night. Officially, he ran five times for -3 yards, but that includes a pair of kneeldowns that combined to lose 8 yards. Take those out and your left with three carries for 5 yards; his rushing DYAR is so bad because of a botched toss that goes down as a fumble for Jones.
17.
Patrick Mahomes KC
15/29
184
0
1
1
-15
-25
10
DEN
Mahomes' average completion gained 9.3 yards after the catch, most in the NFL this week. Not much of that YAC came in scoring range, however. Inside the Denver 40-yard line, he went 4-of-10 for 19 yards with more interceptions (one) than touchdowns (zero).
18.
Matt Ryan ATL
31/41
297
0
0
5
-22
12
-35
TB
Apparently "extreme splits when deep in opposing territory" has become the theme of this part of the table. Ryan struggled inside the Tampa Bay 20, going 1-of-5 for 10 yards with more sacks (one) than touchdowns (zero).
19.
Trevor Lawrence JAX
16/28
145
0
0
2
-30
-4
-26
LAR
Lawrence, on the other hand, didn't have a single bad throw in the red zone ... or, for that matter, any good throws. Or sacks, or DPIs, or intentional groundings, because he didn't have a single play inside the Rams' 20. In L.A. territory, he went 4-of-6 for 20 yards with as many sacks (one) as first downs. His average pass traveled 4.2 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, least in the league.
20.
Joe Burrow CIN
24/40
300
1
2
6
-33
-42
9
LAC
Burrow threw one interception to his left and one to his right but was much better when throwing down the middle, going 7-of-12 for 123 yards and a touchdown.
21.
Lamar Jackson BAL
23/37
253
1
1
7
-40
-54
14
PIT
Many passers had bad days in the red zone this week, but Jackson was worst of all. His last red zone pass was a 6-yard touchdown to Sammy Watkins that could have tied or won the game. That was his only first down inside the Pittsburgh 20, where he went 4-of-8 for 20 yards with an interception and a sack.
22.
Teddy Bridgewater DEN
23/40
257
1
2
1
-52
-49
-3
KC
Bridgewater had the week's best DYAR on throws to receivers at or behind the line of scrimmage (7-of-9 for 59 yards and a touchdown) and throws to running backs (7-of-10 for 95 yards and a touchdown), but he was worst on throws down the middle (3-of-8 for 63 yards with two interceptions, including a pick-six).
Rk
Player
Team
CP/AT
Yds
TD
INT
Sacks
Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Opp
23.
Davis Mills HOU
7/14
49
0
0
2
-70
-76
6
IND
Mills came into the game with Houston down 21-0 in the third quarter. He was successful on only 25% of his dropbacks, worst of any qualifier. Second-worst: Tyrod Taylor, Houston's starter, at 27%. In Indianapolis territory, Mills went 1-of-4 for 5 yards with a sack. He failed to convert a single third down, going 1-of-3 for 14 yards with two sacks and an intentional grounding.
24.
Russell Wilson SEA
30/37
231
2
1
4
-71
-71
0
SF
Wilson threw a dozen failed completions, tied for most in the league. He did not throw for a first down until the Seahawks were down 17-7 in the second quarter; up to that point, he had gone 7-of-8 for 29 yards with two sacks and a fumble.
25.
Taysom Hill NO
19/41
264
2
4
2
-92
-131
39
DAL
In Hill's defense, he was playing against a good defense—he gains 51 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. Still though. Hill was the week's worst passer inside the opponents' 40 (1-of-9 for 24 yards with one touchdown, one sack, and two interceptions), and on deep throws (2-of-8 for 52 yards with two interceptions), and on throws to his right (10-of-21 for 62 yards with two interceptions). The worst receiver this week played for Seattle, but the Saints had the second-worst receiver (Ty Montgomery, who caught 4-of-7 passes for 9 yards), the third-worst receiver (Kenny Stills, 0-for-5, 0), and the fourth-worst receiver (Tre'Quan Smith, 2-of-7, 15). Hill did run very well though.
26.
Mike Glennon NYG
23/42
187
0
1
3
-100
-100
0
MIA
Glennon was successful on 29% of his dropbacks, the lowest rate for any quarterback who started and finished his game this week. With 10:43 to go in the the third quarter, the Giants had the ball in the red zone, down by only seven points. Glennon then failed to pick up a single first down on his next 21 dropbacks, going 5-of-18 for 30 yards while taking three sacks. The next time he picked up a first down, New York was down 20-9 with less than two minutes to go.
27.
Tyrod Taylor HOU
5/13
45
0
1
2
-104
-104
0
IND
Taylor's average dropback came with a league-high 10.5 yards to go for a first down. He left the game early in the third quarter without having thrown a single pass in Indianapolis territory. His five completions gained exactly zero yards through the air. On passes that traveled more than 2 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, he went 0-for-7 with an interception. He was the week's worst passer from under center, going 1-of-3 for 5 yards with an interception.
28.
Andy Dalton CHI
26/41
229
2
4
3
-119
-109
-11
ARI
Dalton gains a league-high 61 DYAR due to opponent adjustments ... for whatever that's worth. He's still in last place because he threw four interceptions and didn't run for 100 yards, but most of his individual splits weren't specifically terrible. True, he was worst in DYAR on throws to his left (9-of-13 for only 53 yards with one touchdown and two interceptions). But he was pretty good on throws down the middle (10-of-14 for 96 yards) and perfect on fourth downs (24-yard gain on fourth-and-5; 11-yard gain on fourth-and-8; 8-yard touchdown on fourth-and-4).

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Total)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
David Montgomery CHI
21
90
1
8/9
51
0
36
21
15
ARI
Montgomery ran for seven first downs, including gains of 13 and 24 yards, while being stuffed four times. Three of his catches gained first downs, including a third-down conversion.
2.
Damien Harris NE
10
111
1
0/0
0
0
32
32
0
BUF
3.
Mike Davis ATL
4
32
1
4/4
37
0
32
19
12
TB
Each of Davis' four carries gained at least 1 yard; his longest was a 17-yard touchdown. He also picked up two first downs as a receiver on gains of 14 and 20 yards.
4.
Alexander Mattison MIN
22
90
1
3/3
34
0
25
12
13
DET
Mattison loses 22 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. The Lions stuffed him only twice while he ran for seven first downs, the longest a gain of 11. He also had two first downs as a receiver on gains of 14 and 16 yards.
5.
Travis Homer SEA
3
80
1
4/5
10
0
25
33
-8
SF
Yes, this is mostly due to Homer's 73-yard touchdown run on a fake punt. But he also had a 3-yard gain on fourth-and-1 in the red zone. His longest reception gained only 4 yards.

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Rushing)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
Travis Homer SEA
3
80
1
4/5
10
0
25
33
-8
SF
2.
Damien Harris NE
10
111
1
0/0
0
0
32
32
0
BUF
3.
Sony Michel LAR
24
121
1
3/4
8
0
20
28
-8
JAX
The Jaguars stuffed Michel five times, but he also ran for six first downs, the longest a gain of 29.
4.
Tony Pollard DAL
7
71
1
2/4
3
0
-1
26
-26
NO
All of Pollard's carries gained at least 1 yard, and while only one went for a first down, that one was a 58-yard touchdown on second-and-10.
5.
Jonathan Taylor IND
32
143
2
0/0
0
0
21
21
0
HOU
Although the Texans stuffed Taylor seven times, he also ran for a dozen first downs, including five runs of 10 yards or more. He would rank higher, but he lost a fumble on first down in Houston territory.

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Total)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
Joe Mixon CIN
19
54
1
0/1
0
0
-46
-42
-4
LAC
Mixon loses 14 DYAR for playing the Chargers, the NFL's worst run defense. He ran for only two first downs, his longest carry gained only 10 yards, he was stuffed three times, and he lost a fumble.

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Rushing)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
Joe Mixon CIN
19
54
1
0/1
0
0
-46
-42
-4
LAC

 

Five Best Wide Receivers and Tight Ends by DYAR
Rk
Player
Team
Rec
Att
Yds
Avg
TD
Total
DYAR
Opp
1.
George Kittle SF
9
12
181
20.1
2
81
SEA
Kittle's totals include 6 rushing DYAR for his one carry for 5 yards. Six of his catches produced first downs, including 24- and 48-yard touchdowns and two other catches that gained 20-plus yards.
2.
Justin Jefferson MIN
11
14
182
16.5
1
73
DET
Jefferson's totals include 1 rushing DYAR for his one carry for 4 yards. Nine of his catches produced first downs, including gains of 34 and 48 yards.
3.
Dallas Goedert PHI
6
6
105
17.5
2
59
NYJ
Five of Goedert's catches produced first downs, including 25- and 36-yard touchdowns. He had another first down on a 21-yard DPI on third-and-10.
4.
Diontae Johnson PIT
8
11
105
13.1
2
56
BAL
Six of Johnson's catches produced first downs, including 5- and 29-yard touchdowns. He had three third-down conversions, one on a 5-yard DPI.
5.
Tee Higgins CIN
9
14
138
15.3
1
50
LAC
Higgins gained seven first downs through the air. Three of them gained 20 yards or more, the longest a 29-yard touchdown.

 

Worst Wide Receiver or Tight End by DYAR
Rk
Player
Team
Rec
Att
Yds
Avg
TD
Total
DYAR
Opp
1.
Gerald Everett SEA
4
6
7
1.8
0
-57
SF
None of Everett's catches gained first downs; two were fumbled away and recovered by San Francisco defenders. Without opponent adjustments, this game was worth -66 YAR, which would obliterate the record for worst tight end game on record. However, the 49ers have been excellent in coverage against tight ends (fourth in the league per DVOA). With those adjustments, this is the second-worst tight end game on record, just behind what Mark Andrews did in Week 3 of last year. The margin is slim enough that Everett's game could be the worst in our database after all once opponent adjustments are finalized after Week 18.
 
Worst Single-Game DYAR, Tight Ends, 1983-2021
Rk Year Player Team Rec DYAR Tgt Rec Yds TD Wk Def
1 2020 Mark Andrews BAL -58 8 3 22 0 3 KC
2 2021 Gerald Everett SEA -57 6 4 7 0 13 SF
3 2006 Jeremy Shockey NYG -53 10 3 15 0 8 TB
4 2015 Jared Cook STL -52 9 3 22 0 13 ARI
5 2007 Dallas Clark IND -51 10 3 15 0 11 KC
6 2014 Jared Cook STL -51 9 3 22 0 15 ARI
7 2017 Jimmy Graham SEA -49 8 3 8 0 1 GB
8 2008 Kellen Winslow CLE -49 13 2 14 0 3 BAL
9 2005 Kyle Brady JAX -48 5 5 43 0 14 IND
10 1986 Bruce Hardy MIA -48 7 3 12 0 8 IND

Comments

76 comments, Last at 08 Dec 2021, 10:35pm

1 Everett’s game was even…

Everett’s game was even worse than the stats considering one of his incompletions was an easy touchdown he somehow turned into an interception

2 I'll be honest, I didn't…

I'll be honest, I didn't expect Allen to be that high. I guess it was a pretty efficient day, even without taking the wind into account. What were his and Jones' opponent adjustments?

4 Vikings lost to a winless…

Vikings lost to a winless team with the 5th best QB (to be fair it wasn't a good week for QBs), 4th best RB, and 2nd best WR.

How does Zimmer still have a job

10 Exactly. The Dolphins had…

Exactly. The Dolphins had their best pass-pro game of the year against the Giants, which allowed Tua the opportunity to throw some bad passes from clean pockets, but also to amass over 100 DYAR. For most of the year, Tua has had precious few clean pockets to throw from. People just don't get it. It's not that the Dolphins offense is designed around RPOs and quick throws, they've had to adapt to that kind of offense because it's the only thing Tua has time to throw (and that only after dodging passrushers, mind you).

It's very clear how Carolina's terrible OL has caused the Carolina offense to look bad no matter who is at QB. But make no mistake, the Dolphins OL is every bit as terrible at pass-pro -and much worse at run blocking-, plus it's been pretty much only Waddle and Gesicki all year catching passes (plus backup TEs, special teamer Mack Hollins oft-cut and resigned Isiah Ford, the ghost of Albert Wilson, and now the finally healthy Parker), and folks are simply refusing to adjust for this. Tua has to be bad, he just has to be for some reason.

This was the time to quietly acknowledge Tua has been quietly developing despite incredibly disadvantageous circumstances, but nope, it's the time to jab him for having severe dropback passing limitations :rolleye:

13 Yep

OL can only block for RPOs. Anything more and you're asking too much of them.

He was also the highest graded passer of the week by pff. 

But you read his description vs those lower than him you'd think he was one of the worst. Weird shots at him while Herbert (beneath him of course) got nothing but praise. Weird.

Tua remains in one of the worst (offensive) situations. Fuller seems to be a bust of a signing too.

Hard for me to call him a problem, like Derrick did, when we've seen a more seasoned Brissett but whatever at this point. 

16 The Dolphins also lead the…

The Dolphins also lead the league in drops (although that stat varies so much from source to source as to be highly questionable) with another 4-6 coming against the Giants, including several on downfield throws.

According to some quoted NextGenStats numbers in the Twitter links from the article, the Dolphins rank last in pocket time and next-to-last in quarterback pressures. Additionally, they rank last in PFF's Oline ratings, 29th to 31st in FO's various Oline stats, have the second fewest yards per running back carry, and the second fewest rushing yards per game.

To my amateur eyes, Tua's throwing mechanics look weird, but I'm not sure how much of that is just him being a lefty. However, judging him as a drop back passer will have to wait until the team fields a reasonably competent offensive line and running game. I will note that it *feels* (to my still amateur eyes) like he has pretty good "pocket presence" and he sells the fake very well for a young quarterback.

He certainly doesn't have elite arm strength. No question about that, but he's been going through his reads much better and been very precise overall. At this point, as a fan of the Dolphins, I'm cautiously optimistic. Now, if we could just get an offensive line, please?

27 His pocket presence is…

His pocket presence is definitely top-notch and his quick release is a huge help. The OL did provide a few clean pockets against Carolina, before their best game against NY, so -dare I say it-, they might be trending up?

The WR situation shouldn't be understated, either. For most of the season, Tua's #3 and #4 options have been Gaskin and the backup TE. The WR room was supposed to be a team strength before the season, oh so long ago, but with Parker and Fuller injured most of the year, Preston Williams unable to bounce back from serious injury, Grant failing to develop and getting traded, and Albert Wilson a ghost of his former self, it's been a sorry-looking bunch.

70 I was pretty down on Tua…

I was pretty down on Tua coming into this year, but I agree with your point of him quietly developing. I think he's under the radar because he doesn't have the volume (missing 5 games didn't help), is on a team with a recently bad record, and the Dolphins' defense has been the story of their win streak. Fittingly enough for his low volume, his DYAR is only 17th - low, but still respectable and better than his 26th place finish last year. I think his 13th place DVOA and 7th(!) place QBR speak better to his development. Some of that might be attributed to the YAC-friendly offense he's in, but I think it's similar to how Shanahan makes Garoppolo look (not a great QB, but definitely not a bad one), and I don't think you could just plug anyone in and expect the same results.

75 I thought Tua and MIA…

I thought Tua and MIA overall were most amongst the QBs/teams most likely to show improvement year-over-year.  I looked pretty stupid 5 weeks ago and will likely still look pretty stupid by the time the year is over, but at least they're taking care of business against the also-rans, meaning they're still in the "almost but not quite contenders" tier, rather than taking a step backwards into the LOL tier.

76 Actually, the offense has…

Actually, the offense has been anything but YAC-friendly. I don't have the numbers, but I'd bet the Dolphins are near the bottom of the league in YAC.

...so I had to go and check. Yup, according to PFF they're tied for worst YAC per completion with the Bills (!).

7 Wow.

How poorly has Mahomes regressed?

He's not even playing like a Top 15 QB now.

 

41 The talent is still there...

In reply to by DIVISION

Not sure what is going on with game execution and/or his decision making, but the ability is still there. It's been a bad year by his standards, but there have been plenty of great QBs that have regressed but still been really good. I think he'll get it together, maybe by the end of the year. If not, maybe next year. But it will happen. He's too smart and works too hard to struggle forever. 

48 Mahomes is 8th in DYAR, and…

Mahomes is 8th in DYAR, and Top Five in both TDs and passing yards, so it's not like he's been a disaster out there. He's fallen off from roughly Tom Brady to roughly Matthew Stafford. He certainly hasn't had nearly as many big plays in the past, but at the same time, half of his interceptions have bounced off one of his receivers' hands.

8 I don't understand the Saints' plan.

Unless they think Winston is the future and Hill remains a gadget player, what are they doing in regards to their cap?

You don't pay a part-time player starter money.

They have pieces in place, but just like the Niners, Broncos are a decent QB away from contending.

15 They don't really have…

They don't really have pieces in place. '22 and '23 are basically lost in terms of ability to seriously contend (as in, they can't really add anyone outside of min salary vets and rookies). In terms of what they're doing for their cap, there's literally only one thing they can do: restructure (and then likely trade) Thomas, restructure Peat, Ramczyk, Kamara, and Lattimore, and likely cut Jenkins (well, and Ingram, but that's a giant 'duh'). That's basically the only way to get them under the cap, but it's still incredibly tight and they lose Armstead, Winston, and Tre'Quan Smith by default. Maybe they keep Armstead by resigning him, and maybe cut Jordan (as a post-June 1). I don't think they can restructure Jordan as he's already super-leveraged (and old).

Even then they're going to be filling like half their roster with draft picks and minimum salary vets. It'll be interesting.

You don't pay a part-time player starter money.

I'd bet that Hill's going to be the starter next year. Realistically they just don't have the space to bring back Winston unless they sign him for a serious deal that they can prorate the bajeezus out of (even then I don't see how, but that makes signing Hill super-weird). Hill's weirdo contract means that all of his QB incentives are NLTBE - because he didn't hit them this year. Which means they don't count against the cap for next year - they're effectively borrowing from '23.

Kindof amazed no one mentioned that. It's only $4.5M next year anyway, but when you're as screwed as the Saints that's a big deal.

9 Does it matter

I'm starting to think it doesn't matter at all if Tua pans out. The Patriots are going to win this division 90% of the time forever. I've kind of given up hope at any meaningful seasons for Miami until Bill retires. NFL competitive balance in the AFC East is broken and has been forever and no one cares.  

12 Ownership issue

In reply to by johonny

The three other owners need to settle down on a Head Coach and stick with a good one instead of firing them and rebuilding every 3.6 years.

The best opposing coach in the division, by record, over the last 20 years was... checks notes... Dave Wannstedt of the early 2000s Miami teams.  (Sean McDermott will likely end with a better record; just going by non-active HCs.)

Since then it's been a collection of guys that get fired because they could not get the division away from Bill+Brady in less than 3-4 years, which was all the leash they were given.  Meanwhile Bill could establish long term plans throughout the coaching staff, have a system in place and veterans that had spent 5+ seasons memorizing the 6" thick playbook.  Turns out that matters.

14 Yup. The rebuild and…

In reply to by TheIdealGrassLaw

Yup. The rebuild and coaching change every 3 years makes it pretty much impossible to build a decent team. 

20 To be fair, it's not like…

To be fair, it's not like they were consistently getting to 10-6 but just losing the division to the greatest dynasty in history. Well, Wannstedt did with the teams JJ built. The rest of the time, you had the Tony Sporano Wildcat team, and Adam Gase(!) going 10-6 in his first year, followed by the usual 7-9 finish. 

30 It's hard to think of any…

It's hard to think of any Miami coaches you'd have hoped to see more of. Sparano might be the best of the bunch. Gase, Joe Philbin, Cam Cameron and Nick Saban are the other options since Wannstedt, who, let's face it, was a bad coach with a good roster.

40 To be fair, it's not like…

To be fair, it's not like they were consistently getting to 10-6 but just losing the division to the greatest dynasty in history.

 

The problem is when you do the continual reboot thing, the talent level gets so low that it becomes impossible to properly evaluate talent. You can't evaluate a young QB if you've got no good receivers and a trashfire of a line and you're constantly playing from behind. 

 

 

I think you need to start looking at building process and foundations. Like, "you've got 3 years to prove you can develop talent and a base of fundamentals that's will allow us to properly evaluate our own players". 

 

 

"You need to win in 3 years" is just insane for some of these teams and how disfunctional they've been. 

42 The problem is when you do…

The problem is when you do the continual reboot thing

It's really worth noting that a lot of times, the "continual reboot" thing is at least partly superficial. There's obviously a crapton of nepotism/cronyism in most of these front offices. Even when they "clean house" there's usually quite a bit of the previous organization that sticks around.

And of course if the owner's actually involved in the organization that just makes it even more superficial.

I don't pay that much attention to the Dolphins/Jets organizations - the Dolphins, at least, don't seem historically inept - but this is definitely true for, say, the Bears/Lions/Browns/Bengals. Those teams can "reboot" all they like and it doesn't change the underlying problems.

56 The Dolphins definitely aren…

The Dolphins definitely aren't in that group now - but they probably were 5 years ago. 

From when Wannstedt left in 2004, until Flores in 2019, they had 4 years with positive point differentials - and those were +28(Sparano),+16(Bowles),+15(Philbin),+1(Saban). And that includes the yearly spectacle where the Patriots somehow vomit all over themselves and lose to the Dolphins. 

Flores hasn't been great - (-188, 66,-34 ), but coming off 2 previous years of Gase at -110 - they look like they're moving in the right direction. 

61 There was also the stretch…

There was also the stretch in the early 2000s when the Jets were actually pretty good in even-years, because that's when Chad Pennington stayed healthy. I can't say the franchise gave up on him too soon, because they tried to make it work for a decade; he just could not stay healthy. He was a damned good QB, and I was sad that he just couldn't stay on the field.

65 True Truth

Pennington was a very smart QB, and mentally tough. I always appreciated him and, as a Pats fan, worried every time he took the field. Just really bad luck with injuries.

22 At some point you have to…

In reply to by TheIdealGrassLaw

At some point you have to stick with your coach, unless he's Joe Judge level bad. There are all kinds of issues with the Dolphins' coaching staff, but when you go with a young coach, I think you have to accept some years of learning pains. A lot of the parts surrounding him seem to be broken, but I would prefer them trying to fix that, even if it results in several years of mediocrity. To be fair, the coaching staff also seems to have some bright spots. Their scripted prep seems very good and at their "1st Quarter Pythagorean Wins" is over 12 (7th best in the league), compared to just over 7 (22nd in the league) for the whole game.

A really good offensive coordinator could do wonders for the Dolphins, IMHO. Preferably one the team could be sure to keep for a while, since constantly swapping offensive coordinators isn't doing your young quarterback any favors either.

62 Which oneS were good?

In reply to by TheIdealGrassLaw

If Wannstedt was "the best"...well not making much of case to stick with anyone else.

Maybe there's a case in being a little more patient (Zac Taylor) but then again, I don't think Keim regrets firing Wilks despite competing with Shanahan, McVay and Carroll. That gauntlet is scarier than one Bill Boogeyman.

Sidenote: the NFL as a whole needs to stop extending coaches so far ahead of time. Like Kliff Kingsbury used Schefter and the OU call to perhaps get another deal but Keim shouldn't cave based off one year. As if Kliff would have actually considered going back to college (where he was bad). 

3.6 years, idk if you made that up or not, but that sounds...alright. 4 years + a team option is usually the standard contract. I guess you have to account for the Keims and Kitchens so it sounds about right imo. 

 

18 Did... did the Bills fire…

In reply to by johonny

Did... did the Bills fire McDermott or something?

The Patriots just beat the Bills by the skin of their freaking teeth and the Bills are still within spitting distance of winning the division. I mean, I get the defeatism with Miami, but that has more to do with Miami than anything else. Sure, New England's probably 90% to win the division this year, but forever's a bit much.

That was literally one of the most bizarre games I've ever seen. That totally felt like Belichick pulling all the tricks in the book.

24 Absolutely. I haven't seen…

Absolutely. I haven't seen Belichick that animated in a regular-season game in forever. Also led to a quote which has to be in TWIQ, where Belichick was asked what from this game will help in the rematch, and he said: "We can use our whole passing game. All the pass plays that we have they haven't seen."

53 He can also wax lyrical when…

He can also wax lyrical when the subject interests him. His appearances on the NFL Greatest 100 shows were really just great; I've watched some of them several times. When he finally retires I hope he can become involved in the media in some way; although I suspect he will have zero interest in the typical major network type broadcasts. Hopefully the NFL Network will give him his own show exploring football history or something. 

60 What's frustrating is that…

What's frustrating is that he loves to talk about football - but the NE sports media is awful and after 20 years still asks him the same terrible questions that he's never ever going to answer:

1. What sort of defensive scheme do you plan on running next week to handle <whoever>. Do you want me to just give you the playbook?
2. What do you think McDermott was thinking when you kept running the ball? You'll need to ask him.
3. How do you feel about Matt Judon's sleeves? Alright, I'm done.

 

 

64 Yeah a few weeks back…

Yeah a few weeks back someone (sorry I don't remember the user) shared one of his comments on the special teams triad (long snapper, punter, kicker) and it was just a great listen. I listen to very little post game from players or coaches in part because it's usually dominated by dumb questions. But this is not the first time that I've heard something great from Belichick. To be fair I've heard some great stuff from other coaches too. But yeah it would be cool if he got something where he could speak about the game. We got a bit of that from Bill Walsh with NFL films oh so long ago and it was fantastic (so was his book). It's a shame how shoehorned some of these football minds get by the media coverage. Dungy is now just another talking head, no real different from any other talking head, but you know listening to him, even now after years of being forced to dumb it all down, that he knows a lot more and if you dig up old stuff you can see how interesting and engaging he can be.

Same with Bill, and like you say I don't think he would bother to try and fit in the mold that the media coverage wants and while he clearly loves the game, he also seems like he could walk away if he can't have it on his terms. That is not meant to be a negative or to say he is closed off or inflexible. I'm very convinced he listens to others and welcomes their inputs, but he doesn't need anything but himself and he doesn't put up with crap he doesn't have any need to.

I also enjoy when he just trolls the media too.

11 Hill played with a splint on right middle finger

Is Vincent Verhei actually paid to contribute to this, or is he (assuming he) a volunteer?

in all of this trolling of Hill, he does not once mention that hill was trying to complete passes in an NFL game with a torn tendon and wearing a splint on his right middle finger.

Instead of commending him for his successes while literally handicapped as a passer, he tears him down without once mentioning the ways that would limit a passer.

put a splint on your own passing hand middle finger and go throw a football around in the park for a while, see if it has an affect.

( I already have tried it , years ago)

I honestly dont get it...

same as i dont understand how Devin White gets to continue to play for the Bucs...he ended Winstons season (career?)  on with an illegal, personal foul tackle...Saints lose 5 straight, White gets 15 yard penalty and a $6600 fine, and continues to play.

Pretty good deal for the Bucs!

 

52 Hill's injury

As a Saints fan, thanks for bringing this up. Other limitations in this game for Hill:

The Saints were missing: former All-Pro WR Thomas; 4x PB RB Kamara; RB Ingram was (re-)injured during the game; TE Trautman is on IR now; neither of the starting OT's played (Ramczyk was All-Pro in 2019, Armstead made the PB from 17-19); LG Peat has been out for weeks (PB the last 3 years); and have been missing their kicker Lutz all year (made PB in 2019). None of their WR's are really starter quality, although Smith and Callaway are perfectly fine #3's and Harris is a fine #4/KR-type. As Vince elaborates, Hill might have been the best Saints offensive player on the field--and he was playing injured!!!

Look at your favorite team: how would your backup QB, coming back from a (different) injury, PLAYING INJURED do without your top-2 RB's, your top WR (or your top 2--cause the Saints don't have a real #2), your top TE, and your 3 best OL? Plus, you've had a revolving door at kicker too. This team, when reasonably healthy, has victories over GB, TB, NE, and WFT (and SEA). The first 3 will probably win their division, and WFT might make the playoffs. The Saints' defense is falling apart now b/c they have collapsed under the load. I doubt that they will lose out b/c of 4 opponents who are in no better shape than they are--but a higher draft pick to pick up more cheap talent would help more in the long run. This is not a team with talent being held back by the QB--WInston was doing perfectly fine. This is a team that has more offensive talent on IR than what is on the field. The defense has good players at most spots, and the weaker positions are manned with young, improving players (e.g. #2 CB). 

19 Taysom Hill reminds me so…

Taysom Hill reminds me so much of Tim Tebow. The biggest differences seem to be that Tebow rarely threw interceptions, and the Broncos were smart enough not to have him throw 40 passes a game (and yes, those two things are related). 

23 Norris Weese

I only recall Norris Weese from the NFL Films "Doomsday Defense" clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXc_Bwtz6fo

25 Mac Jones

"his rushing DYAR is so bad because of a botched toss that goes down as a fumble for Jones."

This seems a little odd.  If the QB tosses the ball to a RB, hits him right in the hands, and the RB drops it, it counts as a fumble for the QB?  This seems like an odd way to score it... seems like it should be on the RB.

 

I find it fascinating that 12 teams got less production out of their QB's than a QB that completed 2 for 3 passes for 19 yards and had a "fumble".  So 12 teams (including the Chiefs!!!) would have done better to call no pass plays and hand off every single down...

28 I find it fascinating that…

In reply to by MJK

I find it fascinating that 12 teams got less production out of their QB's than a QB that completed 2 for 3 passes for 19 yards and had a "fumble".  So 12 teams (including the Chiefs!!!) would have done better to call no pass plays and hand off every single down...

The conclusion doesn't follow from the premises.

29 So 12 teams (including the…

In reply to by MJK

So 12 teams (including the Chiefs!!!) would have done better to call no pass plays and hand off every single down...

No, you can't think about it that way: DYAR doesn't "add" between RBs and QBs because they measure different things - they're essentially on different scales. Even though those QBs were bad relative to average QB play, their individual plays were still more valuable than a running back carry.

It's super hard to compare Jones to other QBs this week just because the Patriots very obviously were playing a totally different game.

33 True, but I'm not even…

True, but I'm not even thinking about the RB's.  What DYAR does do is say how much more (or less) of a contribution a QB made relative to a "replacement level" player.  Jones had a slightly negative DYAR, which implies that a replacement level player would have been expected to contribute slightly more than he did.  Not surprising since he actually contributed very little, and "fumbled" on top of it.

But 12 QB's contributed even less than that.  If any of those 12 QBs had just attempted 3 passes and completed 2 of them for 19 yards, and *not* fumbled, they would have gotten a higher DYAR than Jones (ignoring opponent adjustments, which admittedly played a role).  I.e. they would have contributed more to their team winning (or losing less badly) by not attempting passes.  

I'm saying nothing about a team's total DYAR if they'd chosen running versus passing.  Just marveling that, according to DYAR, 12 QB's (including Patrick Mahomes) contributed less to their team's success than a guy that only threw three passes and "fumbled".

 

38 "But 12 QB's contributed…

"But 12 QB's contributed even less than that.  If any of those 12 QBs had just attempted 3 passes and completed 2 of them for 19 yards, and *not* fumbled, they would have gotten a higher DYAR than Jones (ignoring opponent adjustments, which admittedly played a role).  I.e. they would have contributed more to their team winning (or losing less badly) by not attempting passes."

With one caveat that they aren't all playing the same team, so with defensive adjustments, the same stats as Jones would not necessarily have put them ahead of Jones. 

39 The trouble is when you said…

The trouble is when you said this:

"So 12 teams (including the Chiefs!!!) would have done better"

emphasis mine. The QBs would have had a DYAR closer to 0 (because it's a counting stat) but the teams would not have done better, because options other than the QB passing are worse.

12 QB's (including Patrick Mahomes) contributed less to their team's success

It depends how you define "contributed." Think of it this way: if a QB is, I dunno, completely stupid (let's call him, oh, how about 'Baron Todger') and somehow gets himself unable to play for a week and his backup's forced to play, and that backup is terrible, Todger's DYAR for that week is 0. But he's totally and completely responsible for his team's horrible play because it was his idiot decision that led to it.

In this case, it's really hard to say what Belichick would've done if he had had a "better" QB, so there's no easy way to compare it. That's why I said it's just hard to say because Belichick was obviously playing a totally different game.

edit: There's also a stat "missing" from Quick Reads which would help delineate this: Effective Yards. Jones put up terrible Effective Yards this week. Way worse than those other 12 QBs.

49 OK, fair.  I'll back off and…

OK, fair.  I'll back off and just say that I find it amazing that 12 QB's could have a lower DYAR, a counting stat, than a guy that threw just three passes and fumbled!

 

Any I'm *soooooooo* tempted to change my handle now to "Baron Todger".  That's awesome.

59 Every passing play is a…

Every passing play is a chance to gain or lose DYAR. Incomplete passes lose DYAR, sacks lose a lot more, and interceptions lose even more than that. Jones had just the one incompletion, and no sacks or interceptions. So he never racked up the bad plays that so many other guys did, particularly in a week when so many QBs played so badly.

69 That's why I said that…

That's why I said that Effective Yards (EYds) is "missing" from Quick Reads. Most weeks it's not a big deal, as quarterbacks are playing and contributing roughly similarly - although it'd help The Lamar Jackson problem, too.

This week, though, Jones was a pretty passive participant. 0 DYAR isn't necessarily better than -5 DYAR unless you know the relative context. Drew Lock has -191 DYAR and Tyrod Taylor has -263 DYAR, but Taylor's been asked to contribute more. Hence the 497 EYds vs -100. 

58 "This seems a little odd. …

In reply to by MJK

"This seems a little odd.  If the QB tosses the ball to a RB, hits him right in the hands, and the RB drops it, it counts as a fumble for the QB?  This seems like an odd way to score it... seems like it should be on the RB."

You're not wrong, but that's the way the NFL counts these things. You can't fumble if you never have possession, and the running back never had possession, so the fumble goes to the QB. And since DYAR is calculated via official NFL play-by-play, that's how it works in our numbers too.

71 This seems a little odd.  If…

In reply to by MJK

This seems a little odd.  If the QB tosses the ball to a RB, hits him right in the hands, and the RB drops it, it counts as a fumble for the QB?  This seems like an odd way to score it... seems like it should be on the RB.

It's counted the same as on an interception.  Even if the QB throws a pass that hits the receiver right in the hands, but the ball pops up and gets picked off, the INT still gets counted against the QB.  The idea is that, on any turnover, the player who last possessed the ball is the one held responsible.

34 You're really treating him as a normal 31-year-old QB? Really???

Of course Taysom has expected growth left. He's had, what, a tenth of the minicamp/camp/exhibition/regular season snaps of other 31-year-old QBs? Maybe more like a twentieth? He's clearly athletic enough to handle the next few years anyway, including the bumps and bruises.

Yes, I'd still give him darn long odds. But with the Saints' cap situation, Taysom still strikes me as their obvious, by-quite-a-margin least bad option.

66 "a tenth of the minicamp/camp/exhibition/regular season snaps"

There is a reason for that. And it matters. He doesn't get them because he doesn't deserve them as most UDFAs don't. 

Going with Taysom would be quite a bad option to sink their cap further for a guy with little but weak experience. 

They just need to test Ian Book out.

46 The game has changed

Worst single-game DYAR, tight ends, 1983-2021

The top 9 are all 2005 or later.  Ya can't earn DYAR (positive or negative) by blocking.

47 The throw that clanged off…

The throw that clanged off of Diggs' bicep was one of the more impressive I've seen in a while.  I'm not sure why the announcers were yammering on about Diggs' inside shoulder when the replay showed he was looking outside for most of the time the ball was in the air.  

The TD throw was also really impressive when viewed from the EZ angle.  Live, it looked like an easy pitch and catch, but it was inches from being touched by two NE defenders.  That kind of accuracy through 30+ mph winds is almost hard to believe.  A littler easier to believe than a punt returner who takes advantage of his good fortune when kick bounds away from him by stumbling toward the ball and head butting it, but still hard to believe.

51 Norris Weese

"He won the starting job from Craig Morton in 1979, but Morton won it back six games later."

It's possible that my understanding has been wrong, but what I have read in the past is that he got hurt (with the knee injury that then ended his career) in his last start and so Morton was forced in. Weese was "active" for the remaining games of the season and even attempted four passes, but was supposedly severely compromised, which caused his retirement after the season.

67 Damien Harris

Harris went out with an injury late in the first half and was finished for the day. I guess a 64 yard TD run will help your numbers.

68 It certainly will. As will…

In reply to by RobotBoy

It certainly will.

As will runs of 17 and 22 yards. The last one (in the third quarter) could have gone much farther if he wasn’t already “finished for the day”. It was clear he was injured and in pain for that run.

 

72 The 2005 Colts must have…

The 2005 Colts must have been absolutely terrible at defending TEs, if Kyle Brady catching all 5 of his targets for 43 yards against them was the 9th worst DYAR ever (either that, or maybe Brady had multiple fumbles).