QR Week 7: Robby Anderson, Pro Football's Worst WR

Carolina Panthers WR Robby Anderson
Carolina Panthers WR Robby Anderson
Photo: USA Today Sports Images

Robby Anderson entered the NFL as an undrafted free agent out of Temple, and considering those humble beginnings he has done just fine for himself. He has played 85 games in six NFL seasons and earned over $28 million in the process per Over the Cap. But in recent weeks he has struggled like no receiver we have seen in the past decade. Anderson was our Worst Wide Receiver or Tight End by DYAR last week, and he's our Worst Wide Receiver or Tight End by DYAR this week too.

With 100-plus receivers qualifying every week, it's nearly impossible to finish in last place twice in a row. We checked back over the last decade of Quick Reads and couldn't find another instance where it happened. Some have come close. Jacksonville's DJ Chark was last in Week 6 last year and then next to last a week later. In 2019, Jamison Crowder of the Jets finished last in Week 13 and next to last the next week. (Remarkably, Anderson was also on that Jets team.)

We also found four instances where one receiver finished in last place twice in a three-week span:

  • Cleveland's Jarvis Landry in Week 6 and Week 8 in 2018;
  • Jacksonville's Marquis Lee in Week 15 and Week 17 in 2014;
  • Arizona's Larry Fitzgerald in Week 12 and Week 14 in 2012 (Fitzgerald was not listed at the bottom when those articles were published, but fell to last place with end-of-season adjustments);
  • and Pittsburgh's Mike Wallace in Week 5 and Week 7, also in 2012.

For Anderson, however, this is not just a two-week trend. He was also third from the bottom in Week 5 and made the bottom 20 in Week 4. Anderson's first target this season resulted in a 57-yard touchdown against his old Jets team, but since then his numbers have declined almost every week.

Robby Anderson's Week-by-Week Receiving DYAR, 2021
Week Rec Tgt Yds Avg TD aDOT YAC Rec
DYAR
Opp
1 1 3 57 57.0 1 30.7 11.0 18 NYJ
2 3 6 38 12.7 0 16.2 4.3 -8 NO
3 1 2 8 8.0 0 3.0 5.0 -4 HOU
4 5 11 46 9.2 0 12.8 3.4 -23 DAL
5 2 7 30 15.0 0 15.1 0.5 -30 PHI
6 3 11 11 3.7 1 7.2 1.3 -52 MIN
7 3 9 14 4.7 0 8.6 3.7 -44 NYG
TOTAL 18 49 204 11.3 2 12.2 3.4 -143  

These figures, frankly, are awful. To amass -143 DYAR in less than half a season is beyond comprehension. That's more negative DYAR than anyone had in 16 games in either 2018 or 2019, and only Cincinnati's A.J. Green was worse than that in 2020. It puts Anderson on a 17-game pace for -348 DYAR, which would obliterate the record of -294 set by Miami's Chris Chambers in 2006. Anderson's DVOA of -51.6% would also be the worst in the last 30 years. Only one qualifying wideout has ever finished worse in that category: Tony Jones of the 1991 Houston Oilers, whose DVOA was -59.3%.

Anderson does not have any fumbles this year; his struggles have come in catching the ball (36.7% catch rate) and gaining meaningful yardage. Five his 18 catches have qualified as failed receptions, while only nine have gained first downs, a tiny total for a wideout with seven starts. For comparison's sake, Green Bay's Davante Adams had 10 catches for first downs in one game against San Francisco in Week 3. Anderson has especially struggled on third/fourth downs, catching four of 15 passes for 43 yards with only three conversions.

Anderson's no Pro Bowler, but he has never played this badly before. (If he had, he never would have lasted six seasons.) He has never made the top 40 wideouts in DVOA, but he has had a positive DYAR every year since his rookie season in 2016. So what has changed? He's suffering from butterfingers with five drops already (his career-high is seven, set in each of his first two seasons, according to Sports Info Solutions). He is also a victim of terrible circumstances in Carolina. By DYAR, Sam Darnold has been the worst non-rookie passer in the league this year. (With five touchdowns on the ground, he has been much better as a rusher, but that doesn't have much effect on Anderson's statistics.) Anderson's teammate Terrace Marshall, a second-round rookie out of LSU, has -43 DYAR, which also puts him in the bottom 10 wide receivers. Running back Chuba Hubbard (-18 receiving DYAR) and tight end Dan Arnold (-21 before being traded to Jacksonville) are near the bottom of the rankings at their positions as well.

But not every Panthers player has fared so badly. Christian McCaffrey has 80 receiving DYAR, ranking among the top five running backs even though he has not played since Week 3. DJ Moore has been comfortably above replacement level. It's Moore's success (relatively speaking) that paints Anderson in the most negative light, because he is unquestionably Carolina's No. 1 wideout. Moore tops Anderson in total targets 73 to 49, and has had as many targets as Anderson or more in every game so far this year. It's Moore who is drawing focus and coverage from defenses, which should theoretically open things up for Anderson and provide him with easier opportunities to make plays. Thus far, Anderson has been utterly unable to do so.

The Panthers had better hope Anderson figures things out soon, because he's going to be with them for the foreseeable future. In 2020, his first year in Panther blue, he set career-highs with 95 catches and 1,096 yards. He was rewarded two months ago with a two-year extension worth nearly $30 million. That includes an $8.0 million guaranteed salary next year. Add that to $18.6 million in guarantees for Darnold in 2022, and the Panthers could have a difficult time playing any better than they have in 2021.

 

Quarterbacks
Rk
Player
Team
CP/AT
Yds
TD
INT
Sacks
Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Opp
1.
Matthew Stafford LAR
28/41
334
3
0
1
122
122
0
DET
Stafford finishes in first place despite losing a league-high 45 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He was tremendous on throws to his left, going 11-of-16 for 187 yards and a touchdown, plus a 32-yard DPI.
2.
Joe Burrow CIN
23/37
416
3
1
1
120
127
-7
BAL
Burrow's average completion gained a league-high 8.7 yards after the catch. He was the week's best passer on throws down the middle, going 6-of-9 for 151 yards and a touchdown.
3.
Derek Carr LV
31/34
323
2
1
0
112
115
-3
PHI
Carr was successful on 74% of his dropbacks; no other qualifier had a success rate higher than 68%. He was the week's best passer on throws to the right, going 12-of-14 for 134 yards and a touchdown.
4.
Tom Brady TB
20/36
211
4
0
0
87
87
0
CHI
Brady had the week's best DYAR inside the opponent's 40-yard line ... partly because he spent an unusual amount of time in that part of the field, going 12-of-23 for 116 yards and four touchdowns, plus a 15-yard DPI.
5.
Aaron Rodgers GB
27/35
274
3
0
3
86
82
4
WAS
Rodgers was nearly perfect on throws to his tight ends, going 7-of-8 for 94 yards and a touchdown.
6.
Mac Jones NE
24/36
307
2
0
1
82
78
4
NYJ
Jones had the week's best DYAR on passes to targets at or behind the line of scrimmage, going 8-of-10 for 112 yards and a score.
7.
Ryan Tannehill TEN
21/26
270
1
1
1
54
48
7
KC
Tannehill did not throw an incomplete pass until the Titans were up 14-0 in the second quarter. He led the league in DYAR in the first half, but had the worst DYAR in the third quarter, when he went 5-of-7 for 54 yards with an interception and only two first downs. The interception was especially brutal, costing him 75 DYAR, because it came on third-and-2 in the red zone, though Tennessee was up 27-3 at the time. He did not play in the fourth quarter.
8.
Kyler Murray ARI
20/28
261
3
1
4
46
63
-17
HOU
Murray had the league's best DYAR in the second quarter, going 10-of-14 for 134 yards with two touchdowns and one sack.
9.
Case Keenum CLE
21/33
199
1
0
1
44
47
-3
DEN
Keenum was mostly a silent observer as the Browns built a 10-0 lead and then the Broncos cut that lead to 10-7. He played well after that, though, going 8-of-12 for 77 yards and a touchdown.
10.
Jalen Hurts PHI
18/34
236
2
0
2
39
37
2
LV
Hurts was the week's best passer in the red zone, going 2-for-4 for 30 yards and two touchdowns. However, he was the worst passer out of a no-huddle, going 2-of-8 for 26 yards.
11.
Carson Wentz IND
17/26
150
2
0
1
35
32
3
SF
Wentz had the week's worst DYAR on passes to targets at or behind the line of scrimmage (7-of-8 for zero yards; only two of those completions gained yards). However, he had the best DYAR on deep throws (2-of-6 for 85 yards and a touchdown, plus three DPIs for 97 more yards). Those three DPIs produced 68 DYAR; only six other quarterbacks have that many DYAR on DPIs this season.
12.
Teddy Bridgewater DEN
23/33
187
2
1
2
31
28
3
CLE
This was a very streaky game for Bridgewater. He had only two first downs in his first 11 dropbacks, going 8-of-11 for only 67 yards with an interception. Then he picked up first downs on six completions in a row, going 6-of-7 for 57 yards and a touchdown. And then he had only three first downs the rest of the game, going 9-of-15 for 63 yards with a touchdown and two sacks.
Rk
Player
Team
CP/AT
Yds
TD
INT
Sacks
Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Opp
13.
Jameis Winston NO
19/35
222
1
0
2
25
2
23
SEA
14.
Lamar Jackson BAL
15/31
257
1
0
5
22
-4
26
CIN
Jackson's average pass traveled 14.4 yards beyond the line of scrimmage, most in the league. In second place: his backup, Tyler Huntley, at 12.9 yards. Jackson's 39-yard touchdown to Marquise Brown put Baltimore up 17-13 in the third quarter, but he only threw for two first downs the rest of the game, going 5-of-14 for 65 yards with two sacks from that point forward.
15.
Zach Wilson NYJ
6/10
51
0
0
1
20
20
0
NE
Wilson's last play was a 46-yard gain on a DPI to Keelan Cole early in the second quarter.
16.
Chad Henne KC
11/16
82
0
0
0
18
19
-1
TEN
Henne came into this game with Kansas City down 27-3 in the fourth quarter. His average dropback came with 6.9 yards to go for a first down, fewest in the league. His average completion gained a league-low 2.2 yards after the catch.
17.
Tua Tagovailoa MIA
32/40
291
4
2
1
14
9
6
ATL
Tagovailoa loses 43 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. His four touchdowns covered a total of 27 yards and were somewhat offset by a red zone interception in the second quarter.
18.
Matt Ryan ATL
25/40
336
2
1
1
10
32
-22
MIA
Despite playing with Cordarrelle Patterson, Ryan had the worst DYAR this week on throws to running backs (3-of-6 for 7 yards, no first downs). However, he had the best DYAR on throws to tight ends. Having Kyle Pitts helps, as we shall get to shortly, but Ryan also went 4-of-6 for 42 yards on throws to Hayden Hurst and Lee Smith.
19.
Daniel Jones NYG
24/33
203
1
0
2
6
0
5
CAR
Jones didn't fare very well in Carolina territory, going 10-of-17 for 60 yards with one touchdown, one sack, and an intentional grounding.
20.
Tyler Huntley BAL
5/11
39
0
0
0
-7
-7
0
CIN
Huntley came into the game with Baltimore down 41-17 in the fourth quarter. He threw four passes in Cincinnati territory; all four were incomplete.
21.
Taylor Heinicke WAS
25/36
268
1
1
4
-11
-35
24
GB
Heinicke had the week's worst DYAR in the red zone, going 4-of-8 for 24 yards with two sacks, one interception, and no touchdowns.
22.
Jared Goff DET
22/34
268
1
2
2
-14
-12
-2
LAR
Goff's average pass traveled a league-low 3.9 yards beyond the line of scrimmage. He had the league's worst DYAR in the fourth quarter ... which is strange, because not one of his 11 passes in those 15 minutes hit the turf. But two were intercepted, and the nine that were completed gained a total of just 54 yards.
Rk
Player
Team
CP/AT
Yds
TD
INT
Sacks
Total
DYAR
Pass
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Opp
23.
Geno Smith SEA
12/22
167
1
0
5
-24
-34
10
NO
24.
Mike White NYJ
20/32
202
1
2
1
-28
-28
0
NE
White entered this game with the Jets down 17-0 in the second quarter and immediately cut that lead to 17-7 with a touchdown to Corey Davis. He was virtually tied with Mac Jones (the other quarterback in this game, oddly) for the best DYAR on throws to running backs, going 12-of-14 for 113 yards.
25.
Davis Mills HOU
23/32
135
0
0
2
-45
-45
0
ARI
Mills gains a league-high 51 DYAR do to opponent adjustments. Nobody else gained more than 32. His average completion gained 2.5 yards after the catch, fewest among starters this week. That's partly why he threw 14 failed completions, most in a game this year since Kirk Cousins threw 15 in Week 1. But he only threw nine successful completions, fewer than 23 other quarterbacks this week. Mike White, the Jets' backup, threw 18 successful completions in less than 45 minutes of game time.
26.
P.J. Walker CAR
3/14
33
0
0
3
-66
-73
7
NYG
Walker's average dropback came with a league-high 11.1 yards to go for a first down. That is partly why his success rate was a league-low 18%. In less than a half of football, Walker had the league's worst DYAR on throws down the middle, where all four of his passes fell incomplete.
27.
Patrick Mahomes KC
20/35
206
0
1
4
-98
-91
-7
TEN
By DYAR, this was the worst game of Mahomes' career, surpassing his performance in the Super Bowl. He failed to throw for a single first down inside the Tennessee 40-yard line, going 1-of-6 for 8 yards with three sacks.
28.
Sam Darnold CAR
17/25
111
0
1
3
-98
-98
0
NYG
Darnold had the league's worst DYAR on deep balls, going 0-for-3 with an interception. His deepest completion was caught just 12 yards beyond the line of scrimmage. He did not throw a single pass in the red zone; in New York territory, he went 5-of-7 for 34 yards with an interception and a sack.
29.
Jimmy Garoppolo SF
16/27
181
1
2
2
-121
-111
-10
IND
Garoppolo was the NFL's worst passer on throws to the left, going 7-of-12 for 55 yards with an interception. He only converted one third-down all night, going 3-of-8 for 27 yards with a sack, a fumble, and an interception. But he was not the worst passer on third downs, oh no, he was not. No, that dubious honor goes to...
30.
Justin Fields CHI
22/32
184
0
3
4
-155
-160
5
TB
... this guy! Fields also converted just one third or fourth down, which came with Chicago down 35-3 in the third quarter. On third/fourth downs, Fields went 2-of-7 for 16 yards with two sacks, a fumble, and two interceptions. He did not throw for a first down of any kind until the Bears were down 21-0 in the second quarter; up to that point, he had gone 5-of-9 for 24 yards with two sacks and an interception.

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Total)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
D'Ernest Johnson CLE
22
146
1
2/2
22
0
61
51
10
DEN
Johnson was stuffed for no gain just once in 22 carries, but he gained at least 4 yards 15 times. He ran for seven first downs, including gains of 10 yards (twice) and 20 yards (also twice). One of his receptions—an 18-yard gain on second-and-10—picked up another first down.
2.
Elijah Mitchell SF
18
107
1
0/0
0
0
53
53
0
IND
When I opened Mitchell's play-by-play data, I thought I had sorted his runs by value instead of chronological order, but no, all his best runs came early in the game. He picked up first downs on five of his first six carries, including a 14-yard touchdown and other gains of 12, 14, and 20 yards. But then he didn't run for another first down for the rest of the game. He gained 69 yards on his first six carries, 38 yards on his next 12. Throughout the game, he was stuffed just once.
3.
Damien Harris NE
14
106
2
2/2
7
0
49
52
-4
NYJ
Half of Harris' 14 carries resulted in first downs—including gains of 10, 10, 12, and 32 yards—while he was stuffed just once.
4.
Khalil Herbert CHI
18
100
0
5/5
33
0
47
42
5
TB
Herbert gains 13 combined DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He was stuffed five times while rushing for five first downs, including gains of 12, 13, and 29 yards. He picked up two more first downs as a receiver.
5.
Brandon Bolden NE
2
0
0
6/7
79
1
37
-7
44
NYJ
Each of Bolden's carries went for no gain, but he had a much better day as a receiver. He had four first downs and two third-down conversions, including a 15-yard touchdown on third-and-7 plus gains of 20 and 28 yards.

 

Five Best Running Backs by DYAR (Rushing)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
Elijah Mitchell SF
18
107
1
0/0
0
0
53
53
0
IND
2.
Damien Harris NE
14
106
2
2/2
7
0
49
52
-4
NYJ
3.
D'Ernest Johnson CLE
22
146
1
2/2
22
0
61
51
10
DEN
4.
Khalil Herbert CHI
18
100
0
5/5
33
0
47
42
5
TB
5.
Leonard Fournette TB
15
81
1
2/4
9
0
17
29
-11
CHI
Fournette was stuffed twice, and both of those carries came with Tampa Bay up 35-3 in the second half. Meanwhile, he ran for seven first downs, including gains of 12, 12, and 15 yards.

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Total)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
Darrell Henderson LAR
15
45
0
3/6
19
0
-36
-13
-23
DET
Henderson loses 9 DYAR due to opponent adjustments. He ran for only two first downs against Detroit, with a long gain of 10 yards, while being stuffed three times. Only one of his catches—a 13-yard gain on first-and-10—gained a first down or counted as a successful play.

 

Worst Running Back by DYAR (Rushing)
Rk
Player
Team
Runs
Rush
Yds
Rush
TD
Rec
Rec
Yds
Rec
TD
Total
DYAR
Rush
DYAR
Rec
DYAR
Opp
1.
Alvin Kamara NO
20
51
0
10/11
128
1
11
-38
49
SEA

 

Five Best Wide Receivers and Tight Ends by DYAR
Rk
Player
Team
Rec
Att
Yds
Avg
TD
Total
DYAR
Opp
1.
Michael Pittman IND
4
4
105
26.2
1
86
SF
All four of Pittman's catches gained at least 6 yards and a first down. His two DPIs added 57 yards and two more first downs. Four of those six first downs were third-down conversions.
2.
Ja'Marr Chase CIN
8
10
201
25.1
1
59
BAL
Seven of Chase's receptions picked up first downs; the other was a 6-yard gain on first-and-10. He converted two of his three targets on third or fourth down, including an 82-yard touchdown on third-and-2.
3.
Cooper Kupp LAR
10
13
156
15.6
2
54
DET
Eight of Kupp's receptions picked up first downs, including gains of 27, 29, and 59 yards, plus 2- and 5-yard touchdowns.
4.
A.J. Brown TEN
8
9
133
16.6
1
52
KC
Five of Brown's catches moved the sticks. He had a 24-yard touchdown on third-and-7, plus 24- and 46-yard touchdowns on first-and-10.
5.
Kyle Pitts ATL
7
8
163
23.3
0
51
MIA
Six of Pitts' catches produced first downs; the other was a 13-yard gain on third-and-19. He had five catches of 20 yards or more, more than any other player this week, the longest a gain of 39.

 

Worst Wide Receiver or Tight End by DYAR
Rk
Player
Team
Rec
Att
Yds
Avg
TD
Total
DYAR
Opp
1.
Robby Anderson CAR
3
9
14
4.7
0
-45
NYG

 

Comments

21 comments, Last at 26 Oct 2021, 10:20pm

1 Pittman

Plus, damn, he caught one while the DB was grabbing one arm (and the DPI was not accepted) and the other was a 28 yd game-sealing TD while the DB was probably not interfering (it was bang-bang, but pretty sure contact preceded the ball) but he got hit low around the 6 YL and managed to keep his footing into the EZ.  Both were big boy catches. 

On top of last week's "over the defender's head" catch TD.

6 Pittman is an animal...and…

In reply to by Bobman

Pittman is an animal...and the exciting thing for Colts fans,is that he's still figuring out exactly how to use his body to win thee matchups. You can see his confidence in his abilities grow each game. I wish Wentz would give him more of a chance, and just toss it up for him more often, because his ability to win jump balls is very good. He has strong hands, and a great sense of when to time his jump to high point the ball. Plus he's a lot faster than he's credited as.

If Wentz can pick up his game, I think Pittman is going to start drawing a lot more attention in this league.

2 Again, the worst receiver is…

Again, the worst receiver is the guy who is never targeted, against mediocre dbs, as his qb thinks to himself "F ck! Will this guy EVER get open?!!"

3 That has to be the most…

That has to be the most obscure set of running backs ever to make up the top five RBs for the week, right?

4 Now that I think about it,…

Now that I think about it, that would be an interesting metric: a defense adjusted, qb adjusted, other receivers out on patterns adjusted, pass plays per target. Who is the Inanimate Carbon Rod of receivers, just a mass occupying space because the rules require it?

5 No adjustments needed?

To be targeted you just need the QB to see you as the best option on that play. So no need to adjust for opponents and QB, since all the receivers are in the same situation. In fact, certain kinds of bad QBs could help your target rate.

Target % (aka targets per pass play) should be close to what you want for a wide receiver. For RBs and TEs you might need targets per route run.

It could be affected by the type of routes run. But if a WR has no moves, mediocre hands, but some speed and stamina, he could run fly routes all day to stretch the defense, and yet never get targeted. Maybe that would make him an Inanimate Lightning Rod. His value would only be in attracting one fast DB rather than just anybody. 

7 Now, now, do not discount…

Now, now, do not discount the Nathan Petermen effect. If your qb is also an inanimate carbon rod, and invariably throws to the wrong guy, Jerry Rice could get seperation on every pass play, and never be targeted! 

Measuring awfulness is likely more difficult than measuring excellence!

8 I wonder

Did they ever ask Robby what he thought of Darnold?

12 Like all gracious award…

In reply to by ImNewAroundThe…

Like all gracious award winners, Anderson says,”I could not have won this great award of being the worst WR without the help of my dear friend Sam Darnold.”  

14 It is funny though

I can't imagine Robby moving to Teddy, having a career year and then asking Darnold.

Betting the team just didn't ask. Even though it's a perfect time for him to be honest behind closed doors!

9 Hey, these are the Tennessee Titans

Tannehill did play the fourth quarter, until Logan Woodside came in for the kneel after the final Chiefs turnover. But they didn't attempt a pass on any of the seven fourth quarter plays before the genuflection, so that's not obvious from the play-by-play.

Darn Monday Night Football, knocking Derrick Henry out of his rightful position of last in rushing DYAR.

10 Pah-leeze

So Larry Fitzgerald for a 3-week stretch in '12 was a terrible receiver? (the years prior to which and the years subsequent thereof he then Transformered into a Hall of Fame receiver)

So last week Derrick Henry went from being the best starting running back in the NFL to, for one Sunday, the 2nd-worst starting running back in the NFL?

Dudes. DYAR measures production, not performance. (production we then analytically assign to one guy) It is, at best, a very, very rough measure of individual performance.

I like these articles. But you folks are very much pretending they measure something they actually very much don't.

11 ;-)

In reply to by BigRichie

('Ah, great. THAT guy again!')

13 I have a certain amount of…

In reply to by BigRichie

I have a certain amount of skepticism when it comes to DYAR, but week-to-week fluctuations really have nothing to do with it. Rest assured, Patrick Mahomes is not a worse quarterback than Mike White or P.J. Walker.

19 "But you folks are very much…

In reply to by BigRichie

"But you folks are very much pretending they measure something they actually very much don't."

Who are "you folks" and what are they pretending? Perhaps you're ascribing a behavior or lack of understanding to the writers and readers that doesn't actually exist. 

15 As to Darnold, I thought 5th…

As to Darnold, I thought 5th year options were not guaranteed except for injury. Did that change or is this a player-specific situation?

16 It changed in 2020, it's…

It changed in 2020, it's totally guaranteed. The amount also bumped up a lot. Murray's 5th year option, for instance, has a high chance of being the same cost as a franchise tag (assuming he gets a Pro Bowl berth, which would be deserved but might actually be hard in the NFC). 

Quarterbacks basically always hit the playtime tier, so nominally they're calculated as the average of the 3rd to 20th salaries. Hit 1 Pro Bowl and you're at the transition tag level, hit 2 Pro Bowls and you're at the franchise tag level.

17 2016 not 2006

but he has had a positive DYAR every year since his rookie season in 2006.

You meant 2016.  I had Robby on my FF team last year and so paid attention, and he was solid, so I'm flummoxed at the performance this year as well.