How to Fix the Las Vegas Raiders

Las Vegas Raiders QB Derek Carr
Las Vegas Raiders QB Derek Carr
Photo: USA Today Sports Images

NFL Week 11 - Why was Derek Carr so darn emotional after the Las Vegas Raider's Week 10 25-10 loss to the Indianapolis Colts?

Maybe it had something to do with plays like this:

Going for it on fourth-and-2 near midfield is perfectly reasonable. The play call is fine: Josh Jacobs is having an excellent season, and Josh McDaniels had success with toss runs like this for years while coaching the Patriots.

But the effort and execution? Sheesh.

Davante Adams (17) just whoopsie-doodle "blocks" Kenny Moore. Kolton Miller (74) has a tougher assignment on Stephon Gilmore (5) on the outside, but that's a block that a left tackle earning $18 million per year needs to execute.

And that's just the Raiders offense. Their real problems are on defense. Check out Parris Campbell's touchdown on a routine slant:

We'll cut Amik Robertson (21) some slack for getting beat; he shouldn't even be on the field and is doing his best. Deep safety Trevon Moehrig (25) is late to react to the play, takes a horrible angle, then finishes things off with a half-hearted tackle attempt near the goal line. Moehrig, like Miller, is supposed to be better than that.

Seriously, can anyone in the Raiders secondary even run? (You knew the Matt Ryan scramble was coming.)

No wonder Carr was fuming like a not-mad-but-disappointed dad pouring his second Scotch after the game, stopping himself just short of ripping his teammates' effort to shreds. "It's hard knowing what some guys are doing just to practice. What they're putting in their body just to sleep at night, just so we can be there for each other. And I wish everybody in that room felt the same way about this place. And as a leader, that pisses me off." Not too hard to read between the lines there: guys are dogging it, and Carr is fed up with it.

The Raiders were supposed to be competitive this year. Instead, they are 2-7 and coming off three straight miserable losses. McDaniels is already getting dreaded "votes of confidence" from Mark Davis. It's time for…

Las Vegas Raiders TankWatch

The Raiders Story So Far

Despite a roster and culture that rotted from the inside out during the Jon Gruden/Mike Mayock era, the Raiders spent a small fortune in cap space and draft capital on Davante Adams and signed Chandler Jones instead of aggressively rebuilding in the offseason.

Did a) new showrunner Josh McDaniels think he could fast-track a contender, or did b) Mark Davis fool himself into thinking his Raiders were just two players away from the Super Bowl after a fluky 10-7 finish in 2021? The answer is clearly b), though there may have been some truth to a) as well.

Coaching Situation

McDaniels has been a non-entity thus far in 2022. The Raiders offense looks like a slightly reskinned version of Gruden's scheme. There has been no faux Belichickian bluster or brimstone, for better or worse. The Raiders' habit of blowing 17-point leads—three of them so far this season—betrays both a failure to adjust and the general malaise that was impossible not to spot in the Colts loss.

Defensive coordinator Patrick Graham has failed to build upon his modest success with the Giants in 2020 and 2021.

Quarterback Situation

Derek Carr has done his usual outstanding job of not being the Raiders' problem while not really being part of the solution, either. He ranks 14th in DYAR after three straight years in the top 10. More was expected of Carr with the arrival of All-Pro college chum Davante Adams, but the absences of Darren Waller and Hunter Renfrow have contributed to Carr's decline.

Carr accepted a restructured contract in the offseason which makes him easily releasable at the end of this year. It was an early sign of what we saw in Sunday's press conference: both sides may be ready to end a relationship that has long felt a little strained.

In the fine Raiders tradition, McDaniels made sure there was no plausible successor to Carr on the roster. No, Marcus Mariota in 2020/2021 doesn't count. (See: any recent Falcons game.)

What's Going Right?

Mostly special teams, Josh Jacobs, and Maxx Crosby:

  • Crosby remains excellent. His seven sacks are tied for 10th in the league. Sports Info Solutions credits him with 30 pressures, tied for 20th in the NFL, despite the fact that Crosby gets little help from the rest of the Raiders defense.
  • Per DVOA, the Raiders rank seventh in the NFL in rushing offense.
  • The Raiders rank ninth in first-down offense, which ties into their rushing success. McDaniels' offense has generally looked solid when it remained balanced and stuck to the game script, give or take brownouts like the Week 8 shutout at the hand of the Saints.
  • Dan Carlson has been 15-of-15 on field goal attempts, 5-of-5 from beyond 50 yards.
  • A.J. Cole has pinned opponents inside the 20-yard line 15 times without a single touchback. Shoutout to Mack Hollins and the punt gunners!
  • More special teams: the Raiders lead the NFL in special teams "hidden points." Opponents have missed six field goal attempts of 30 to 50 yards against the Raiders. In other words, things could get a little worse for the Raiders if their field goal rates for and against slide back toward central tendency.

What Has Gone Wrong?

A partial list:

  • The Raiders rank last in total defense DVOA, last in pass defense DVOA, 27th in first-down defensive DVOA, 30th on second downs, and 29th on third/fourth downs.
  • The Raiders defense somehow recorded a total of just two sacks against the Texans, Saints, Jaguars, and Colts, in part because…
  • Chandler Jones has flopped as a free-agent acquisition: half a sack, 20 pressures, a slow fade into a rotational role on a bad defensive line.
  • The entire offensive line to the right of Kolton Miller has been a swirling mass of mediocrity.
  • The on-and-off absences of Waller and Renfrow have highlighted the Raiders' lack of skill position depth. Hollins should not be a starting NFL wide receiver. Foster Moreau is an adequate replacement for Waller, but the Raiders are down to Jesper Horsted as TE2 and Keelan Cole as WR3 with Waller and Renfrow out. The Raiders also lack a dangerous change-of-pace back for Jacobs because they released Kenyan Drake during training camp.
  • The Raiders just added Chargers castoff defensive lineman Jerry Tillery. If effort and execution are their biggest problems, Tillery isn't the guy to help.

Building Blocks and Future Assets

The Raiders have famously parted ways with four of their first-round picks since 2019 for a wide variety of reasons -- most recently Johnathan Abram -- as well as former second-rounder Trayvon Mullen. Their 2022 first- and second-round picks were traded for Adams, of course.

The only recent first-round picks still on the roster are Miller (2018), Jacobs (2019), and Clelin Ferrell (2019), an adequate-at-best rotation player on the defensive line. Moehrig (see the intro) is the only recent second-round pick by the Raiders still on the roster. The team's draft failures are most noticeable on the offensive line and on the defensive back seven, where there just isn't enough raw talent to go around.

The good news is that the Raiders have all of their significant draft picks moving forward. Crosby, Miller, Adams, and Renfrow (when healthy) are all relatively young, playing at a high level, and under contract through 2024. The Jones and (possibly) Waller contracts may be a headache moving forward, but the Raiders have $36 million in paper cap space for 2023 and can goose it up to $60 million by releasing Carr.

A team could do far worse than starting a rebuilding plan with a Pro Bowl-caliber left tackle and edge rusher, plus some solid receivers. The fact that Walkthrough wrote almost the same thing about the Panthers a month ago illustrates just how far the Raiders have fallen.

Rebuilding Plan

Step One: Actually plan to rebuild: It's obvious that Mark Davis misread the Raiders' 2021 late-season surge (fueled largely by wins in COVID-impacted games) and thought his team was ready to win now. McDaniels probably played along because he figured he could coax a Carr-Crosby-Davante-Waller team to about 10 wins and earn about four years of job security. It didn't work out as planned. Now it's time to get real.

Step Two: It's new quarterback time: Opting in to Carr's slow, disgruntled decline would be foolish. McDaniels must find his next Mac Jones. Candidates include a rookie, a low-baggage placeholder with touch/mobility (Geno Smith, Daniel Jones), or maybe Mac Jones.

Step Three: Upgrade at defensive coordinator: Patrick Graham earned this shot by making chicken salad out of the Giants defense and being the designated grownup on Joe Judge's staff. But the Raiders defense is static and predictable. Players blow routine assignments. The hustle leaves a little something to be desired. McDaniels will need to sacrifice a pawn soon, and Graham's a worthy candidate. Brian Flores would be a logical replacement if McDaniels wants to keep things in the greater Belichick family.

Step Four: Bigger/stronger/faster on defense: Duron Harmon and (when healthy) Divine Deablo are two of the most reliable Raiders defenders, and both change directions like tractors. Mayock's drafts left the Raiders defense nearly devoid of talent. They need to channel the ghost of Al Davis and lean into the measurables in future drafts.

Step Five: Keep checks and balances on McDaniels: Davis insists that McDaniels will keep his job, and that tracks. McDaniels is too high-profile to give up on after one season without Davis losing serious face, and McDaniels is probably having little trouble in Raiders headquarters blaming (with much merit) the team's woes on Gruden and Mayock.

(Per reports on Wednesday, Davis cannot fire McDaniels because he cannot afford to. That tracks. Davis may be the most cash-poor owner in the NFL. He's still paying Gruden at least some of the $40 million which was left on his contract. Adams' signing bonus alone places $40 million into escrow. The franchise relocation is probably costing Davis lots of money he has not yet recouped. That said, Davis would still be reluctant to fire McDaniels for purely optical reasons.)

That said, McDaniels' Broncos drafts in 2007 and 2008 made Mike Mayock look like early-1980s Bobby Beathard. Sure, McDaniels hit on Demaryius Thomas, but Mayock hit on Crosby and Renfrow. Overall, those drafts stunk.

McDaniels' other personnel moves merit closer inspection. Abram whiffed on his share of tackles, but he had a high-effort reputation and was quickly gobbled up by the Packers. It's not like the Raiders are loaded with talent in the secondary. Drake's departure was cast as a cost-cutting move, but that just circles back to the question of whether the Raiders thought they were rebuilding (Cut costs! Don't sign over-the-hill edge rushers!) or competing (An all-purpose back can help!)

All in all, McDaniels looks like a seat-of-the-pants personnel guy, not a long-range planner, and general manager Dave Ziegler is an imported Patriots functionary. Add a heavy-handed Davis to the mix and the Raiders have the formula for a franchise trying to move in several directions at once. For evidence, see … this entire season.

The Raiders need guardrails. Unfortunately, they are unlikely to get them: neither Davis nor McDaniels has any interest in adding a stronger personnel voice to the org chart between Davis and McDaniels.

Final Prognosis

The Raiders have ignored their roster infrastructure since the day Jon Gruden arrived in 2018. Gruden first larded the depth chart with veteran journeymen. Then he traded Khalil Mack for draft picks, which might have helped, but Mayock spent those picks on pet projects and players at low-leverage positions. Instead of using the 2022 draft to reinforce the roster, the Raiders traded for Adams. McDaniels should have ordered a clean rafters-to-ceiling "culture change" but didn't. His reputation as anything other than a playcaller and Belichick wingman, shaky to begin with, is taking another hit as a result.

Carr, the last holdover from the Dennis Allen/Reggie McKenzie era, has seen it all and seen enough. Carr has become a symbol of the Raiders' never-ending indecision—they keep swapping out everything else except their good-not-great quarterback—but he deserves better than to be associated with this era of splashy confusion. Carr deserves a chance to move on. McDaniels owes it to himself to at least try to remake this roster in his image.

As for Davis, the only way he will ever step out of his father's shadow is by staying out of the way.

Comments

40 comments, Last at 18 Nov 2022, 9:18am

#1 by shaunnewkirk // Nov 17, 2022 - 10:51am

Step Two: It's new quarterback time: Opting in to Carr's slow, disgruntled decline would be foolish. McDaniels must find his next Mac Jones. Candidates include a rookie, a low-baggage placeholder with touch/mobility (Geno Smith, Daniel Jones), or maybe Mac Jones.

 

Heck, at this current point the Raiders are more in line to pick inside the top 5 than anything and right now they have the #2 pick. Depending upon how the rest of the season goes, they could be in line to grab Stroud or Young in the draft. The tricky part is Carr here. If they lock up the #1 or #2 pick, they can safely release Carr because they are guaranteed to get one of Young or Stroud. If they finish something like #3-5, they might need to trade up depending upon who is in front of them but they probably want to make sure they make that trade up before releasing Carr so they aren't left with no QB in 2023. To their benefit, looking at the teams that are good bets to finish in the top 5 picks:

Texans: need a QB
Panthers: need a QB
Eagles via the Saints: don't need a QB
Jaguars: don't need a QB (or at least, aren't taking one there)
Bears: don't need a QB (or at least, aren't taking one there)
Seahawks via Denver: who knows but they probably just stick with Geno?

They just really need to make sure they are in front of one of Houston or Carolina and are somewhere between pick 1-4 to feel safe to release Carr. If they find themselves like behind both Texans and Panthers and at pick #5 or something, they should be making the pick move up before releasing Carr.

 

Points: 0

#8 by theslothook // Nov 17, 2022 - 11:58am

Eagles via the Saints: don't need a QB

I had completely forgotten that the Saints made that inocuous trade. My god, what a disaster decision. I remember learning this lesson when the 49ers traded a future first with the Patriots. Now, the results turned out pretty good; they drafted Joe Stayley and the Patriots ended up with Jarod Mayo. But still; they effectively traded a top 10 pick the next year for the 31st pick this year. Just a mind numbingly terrible decision that happened to work out.

I could sort of understand why if Mickey Loomis felt like his job was at stake, but you really really shouldn't be trading future firsts willy nilly because the downside can look absolutely terrible. 

Points: 0

#15 by KnotMe // Nov 17, 2022 - 12:32pm

In a sense, Carr is the worst possible QB situation.  Not good enough to get you anywhere, but not bad to get rid of and your odds of getting a guy who is better are not great.  This situation is terrible for both the team and job security. 

This is why I was amazed when NE actually chose that situation on their own. 

Points: 0

#16 by Pat // Nov 17, 2022 - 1:31pm

I had completely forgotten that the Saints made that inocuous trade. My god, what a disaster decision.

It's not as bad as you think.

Oh, not because the Saints don't need the pick. They absolutely do. They're just so violently screwed cap-wise that a high draft pick next year would've cost them around $4-5M+ compared to what they spent on Penning, and even the second-rounder the next year would be another $M or so. And they seriously need the cash.

The Saints went all-in without a backup plan. Everyone knew it would all fall apart eventually and be bad when it did. This year would've been their best option to have minor down years in '22 and '23 and be in solid shape likely with a high QB pick and good talent in '24.

Instead, they chose... poorly.

Points: 0

#18 by ImNewAroundThe… // Nov 17, 2022 - 1:39pm

That means they'll be cheap and you can keep Carr as the bridge/placeholder/trade bait!

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#35 by RaiderCat // Nov 17, 2022 - 9:27pm

Cutting Carr has to be done in Feb, or we owe him 32 mil, and we get nothing for him due to no trade clause. We can't pick up a fa because we are 7th in dead money, and cutting Carr adds 5 mil, and Davis is broke. Every McDummy QB choice has been a failure except Jimmy G, who is only playing due to a broken ankle. So McDummy drafts another Teblow, instead of o line, and the new Teblow gets killed behind the even worse o line that didn't get drafted because they had to draft him, and has to outscore the worst d in the NFL that also didn't get drafted because they had to draft the QB. Probable outcome is it ruins the rookies career, and then McDummy is fired just like Denver. "Those that ignore history are destined to repeat it"...

Points: 0

#2 by theslothook // Nov 17, 2022 - 11:12am

I mentioned this in another thread, but this season you can feel the chickens coming home to roost after Mark Davis inexplicably shanked Reggie McKenzie for Jon Gruden. Reggie, for those who don't remember, took on the suicide mission that was the Raiders who had just tossed two first round picks for Carson Palmer and only to let him leave within a year and that team was coming off the heels of the disastrous Jamarcus Russel era.

Jon Gruden and his puppet, Mike Mayock, proceeded to dismantle all of the ground work McKenzie had laid down and then built this freak show in it's place. Normally I don't agree with Tanier's Shakespearean tragedy narratives, but this one fits. And then hiring McDaniels in the aftermath was the moment Othello strangled Desdemona. 

Moving forward, the Raiders are in a brutal spot. Mark Davis probably isn't rich enough to rip the cord from McDaniel's, which only for stalls the inevitable crash. And moving on from Carr makes sense only because it frees him to help some other team because he's nowhere good enough to lift this terrible mess to anything other than disappointing. 

Obviously I could be wrong as Eagles managed an amazing coup after they looked dead and buried. But most likely, this feels like a multi year wandering in the desert.

Points: 0

#4 by serutan // Nov 17, 2022 - 11:25am

Obviously I could be wrong as Eagles managed an amazing coup after they looked dead and buried. But most likely, this feels like a multi year wandering in the desert.

   But the Eagles have a GM who is not a coach's puppet and who is apparently trusted by the owner.  As you alluded, the Raiders have not had anything like that kind up setup since Gruden was hired.

Points: 0

#12 by Pat // Nov 17, 2022 - 12:22pm

Philly changed a ton less 2 years ago than the Raiders did this past offseason. They kept several of the same coaches and obviously the GM and front office staff stayed the same.

As you alluded, the Raiders have not had anything like that kind up setup since Gruden was hired.

Way before that. There was friction between the owner and GM ever since Mark Davis took over. It's bizarre that the opinion of him is that he's more hands off, when he jumped in and fired people when an interview with the new GM came out that criticized his dad. I highly doubt Davis trusts anyone there.

Points: 0

#26 by pokerfink // Nov 17, 2022 - 2:27pm

the Eagles have a GM who is not a coach's puppet and who is apparently trusted by the owner

Roseman (GM) has the deepest of trust from Lurie (owner).  There were some rumblings that Roseman might get fired a couple years ago after some high profile draft busts (passed on Metcalf for JJ Arcega-Whiteside, and then passed on Jefferson for Jalen Reagor).   But those were squashed pretty quickly.  Lurie is someone who values trust and loyalty; he wants "his guy" in charge of the team.  Roseman is his guy.

And to Roseman's credit, he hit a grand slam on the rebuild.

Points: 0

#27 by Pat // Nov 17, 2022 - 2:42pm

And to Roseman's credit, he hit a grand slam on the rebuild.

Waaaaay too early. This is the easy year (and it's not exactly a grand slam yet! 8-1 sounds great, 8-9 doesn't) - a huge portion of the defense is just totally a 1-year rental (with heavy amounts borrowed from the future!) and the offensive line still has Kelce and Lane.

It's the same thing as saying "man, the Rams GM just knocked it out of the park." Yeah, last year, they won a Super Bowl. That's awesome. But they got there by borrowing the hell out of their draft. Which you could say "yeah, but obviously that's totally worth it" and it's worth it because they won the Super Bowl.

Building an offensive core of Hurts, Brown, and DeVonta Smith is totally a feather in Roseman's cap, but this team's still carrying multiple extremely high-level players from the Super Bowl team and many others are currently 1-year rentals. It absolutely could still all fall apart at this point.

Points: 0

#3 by serutan // Nov 17, 2022 - 11:16am

Did a) new showrunner Josh McDaniels think he could fast-track a contender,
b) Mark Davis fool himself into thinking his Raiders were just two players away from the Super Bowl after a fluky 10-7 finish in 2021?

 

The correct answer is: c) Mark Davis wanted a shiny new toy instead the coach (Bisaccia) who got them to that 10-7 finish and the players apparently loved.  Would Bisaccia have been a long term success?  No idea, but as you said about Patrick Graham I sure do think he earned the chance.

but Mayock spent those picks on pet projects and players at low-leverage positions.

Anyone who thinks Mayock was doing anything in the early rounds other than picking who Gruden told him to IMO doesn't understand Gruden had full control and exercised it.

Per reports on Wednesday, Davis cannot fire McDaniels because he cannot afford to. That tracks. Davis may be the most cash-poor owner in the NFL.

Yes, that is VERY plausible.  It should be noted that the cash poor part has been true ever since Al got control.

 

Points: 0

#9 by theslothook // Nov 17, 2022 - 12:03pm

I genuinely wonder who stands to inherit the Raiders once Mark Davis passes away. He has no kids and is Al Davis' only child. There was a pretty vicious article covering Mark Davis' zanny personality as a direct result of Al Davis being a horrible person to be around. I suppose, for practical purposes, Mark Davis should just sell the team and live cash rich instead of tying up his entire net worth into this one asset that everyone else in the league treats as the world's most expensive hobby but he cannot. It's a bit like owning an expensive luxury vehicle but being unable to get rid of the check engine light because all of your money is going to pay insurance and gas. 

But then, I have to admit, I have a certain nostalgia for legacy ownership. My grandmother was one of only two people to own the entire floor of her skyscraper outright. It was a source of great pride for her. Her three children, who all hate each other, grabbed each floor with the ultimate desire to sell it off for cash. I sort of am hoping my father doesn't do that and the family name remains as an hommage to her; even though absolutely none of her kids or grandkids live in that city anymore and have 0 plans to move their. 

Points: 0

#13 by Paul R // Nov 17, 2022 - 12:26pm

Your description of Mark Davis' situation reminds me of the old adage that the two happiest days in a man's life are the day he buys a boat and the day he sells it.

Points: 0

#17 by serutan // Nov 17, 2022 - 1:38pm

There was a pretty vicious article covering Mark Davis' zanny personality as a direct result of Al Davis being a horrible person to be around. 

 

   I remember seeing an article from around the time Al died that Al kicked Mark out of meetings with contemptuous remarks about Mark's abilities.

Points: 0

#5 by ImNewAroundThe… // Nov 17, 2022 - 11:29am

Because the QBs he's used draft picks on are Tom Brandstater, Tim Tebow and Stidham. But also

Candidates include a rookie,

Sure.

a low-baggage placeholder

Absolutely not. 

Points: 0

#6 by Raiderfan // Nov 17, 2022 - 11:36am

You were not bad in your analysis, but I think you needed to be much more brutal, especially on Davis for the Gruden hire.  The o-line has actually gotten better, but the skill position players are as bad as you cited.  And the defense just sucks.  When I watch them, on any given play I wonder whether they will commit a penalty, blow one or more tackles, or both.  It is usually (c)).

Points: 0

#22 by ImNewAroundThe… // Nov 17, 2022 - 1:48pm

Carr is average (with Stafford possibility), a good RB (apparently), Waller, Adams and Renfrow. Yeah injuries hurt but losing WR2 and complaining about backup TEs is weird. There's like 5 good TEs so 6-96 of course stink.

Points: 0

#7 by NYChem // Nov 17, 2022 - 11:47am

The idea of Brian Flores stepping in as DC to McDaniels HC would strike me as one of the most unjust pairings ever in a league with no lack of examples. 

Points: 0

#10 by IlluminatusUIUC // Nov 17, 2022 - 12:09pm

On the plus side, Davis is so poor that he could not afford to pay Flores to throw games. Every loss would be 100% legitimate. 

Points: 0

#14 by KnotMe // Nov 17, 2022 - 12:27pm

Flores would be set to take over when McDaniels gets canned after the season. You could certainly do worse. 

Points: 0

#21 by theslothook // Nov 17, 2022 - 1:43pm

I know Vrable is technically part of the coaching tree, but he was never a coach under Belichick so I don't quite count him in that group. That means only Flores has had any kind of success and probably should be a head coach again. The rest, though, are ghastly. 

Just when you think you've seen the worst of them, they keep one upping each other. I don't know if I would rather start my franchise with Patricia, Weiss, or McDaniels. I suppose its a bit like deciding between ricin, cyanide, or rosary pea - it all ends in a smoking crater of a death sentence.  

Points: 0

#24 by serutan // Nov 17, 2022 - 1:52pm

I don't think Vrable ever coached under BB, so he definitely doesn't count.

And in fairness, Romeo Crenell was OK if nothing to write home about.

Points: 0

#32 by KnotMe // Nov 17, 2022 - 5:21pm

Brian Daboll was actually an assistant under Belichick for 11 years. So apparently it's maybe ok to get guys who worked with him...as long as it wasn't as a coordinator. 

Points: 0

#39 by dryheat // Nov 18, 2022 - 9:15am

He left NE originally because he was leap-frogged for a promotion by the younger, newer-to-the-organization, Josh McDaniels.  Memories.

 

I still think McDaniels can be a good coach -- an excellent coach, even -- if he tone down his ambition and can live with that.  He is poorly equipped to run all aspects of a football organization, no matter how many years he stood next to Belichick.

Points: 0

#11 by Pat // Nov 17, 2022 - 12:18pm

  • The Raiders defense somehow recorded a total of just two sacks against the Texans, Saints, Jaguars, and Colts, in part because…

Mostly because the defensive coordinator just has no idea what he's doing. It's not like he's got some giant track record of success.

The Raiders pass rushers actually win blocks fairly often. They're middle of the pack in pass-block win rate. But they generate no pressures, because they barely ever do anything creative to free up pass rushers, so literally it's just a question of straight up pressure, and you can always beat that in the NFL with halfway-decent game planning.

As someone else pointed out elsewhere, they started the game with a similar stunt that the Patriots ran in the prior week. Except its execution was all borked - the only thing it had in common was the movement of one lineman. The Colts picked it up easily because the center wasn't distracted at all. And they basically did nothing else, either.

Points: 0

#23 by serutan // Nov 17, 2022 - 1:49pm

Mostly because the defensive coordinator just has no idea what he's doing.

 

   Not saying you're wrong, but I do have to wonder if at least some of this mess is because - as the British like to say - the players have dropped tools.

Points: 0

#28 by Pat // Nov 17, 2022 - 2:44pm

Like I said, the players individually are actually not doing bad. It's just that when you put them together as a team, they're not really getting results. It's hard to blame that on the players, unless they're literally not doing what they're supposed to, and, uh, no one's job is that secure.

Points: 0

#38 by David // Nov 18, 2022 - 5:01am

as the British like to say - the players have dropped tools

The British do not like to say that.  The idiom is that people have downed tools.

Points: 0

#29 by anotheroldguy // Nov 17, 2022 - 2:54pm

I think that's a confused metaphor?
Floor to ceiling? Foundation to rafters?
Or Las Vegas just needs to remodel the attic?

Points: 0

#31 by johonny12 // Nov 17, 2022 - 5:09pm

It's a QB starved league. I'm pretty sure someone will trade for Carr. I would not release him. The Colts are due for another QB trade and if not them, someone else. Given the lack of QBs this season there is someone that will take him and leave you picks. Maybe a lot of picks. 

Points: 0

#37 by IlluminatusUIUC // Nov 17, 2022 - 9:47pm

In reply to by johonny12

Carr has a No Trade Clause, so the Raiders don't have that option. 

Points: 0

#36 by LionInAZ // Nov 17, 2022 - 9:29pm

My take on the Raiders coaching situation: the weakness of the American system is that reprehensible people get off because contracts and legal settlements. The rest of us suffer for their bad behavior. 

Points: 0

#40 by dryheat // Nov 18, 2022 - 9:18am

Is this also applicable to the Commanders' ownership situation?

Points: 0

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